UPDATED: Apparently J. Christian Adams' DOJ Sources Aren't Very Good

Blog ››› ››› MATT GERTZ

Earlier this month, GOP activist and New Black Panther Party provocateur J. Christian Adams took to Pajamas Media to breathlessly report that he had "learned through sources inside and outside the Department of Justice that the long-awaited internal report on the New Black Panther voter intimidation dismissal is done, and sensible Americans aren't going to be happy." Based on those "sources," Adams wrote of the then-pending report from Justice Department's Office of Professional Responsibility (emphasis added):

What does the OPR report conclude? Indications are that it will conclude that nobody did anything improper in dismissing the case. But it apparently goes even further and concludes that the case was brought because of racial bias, or at least with an insensitivity to Mr. Holder's "people." In doing so, signs are that the authors of the report are perfectly willing to adopt some of the favorite lines of the extreme left-wing blogosphere about people who worked on the case and the principle of equally enforcing the law.

Americans know a whitewash when they see it, especially a racially unfair one.

That's right, Adams' DOJ sources were supposedly telling Adams that a branch of the federal government was about to officially brand him as a racist. I guess that's the sort of thing you can believe when you spend your time peddling the fantasy that DOJ is engaged in pattern of racially-charged corruption.

In a letter yesterday to Rep. Lamar Smith (R-TX), chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, OPR's Robin Ashton stated that their investigation "concluded that Department attorneys did not commit professional misconduct or exercise poor judgment, but rather acted appropriately, in the exercise of their supervisory duties in connection with the dismissal of the three defendants in the NBPP case" and "found no evidence that the decision to dismiss the case against three of the four defendants was predicated on political considerations." This is in line with all available public information on the case.

But apparently Adams' paranoid conviction that OPR was about to declare him a racist was flat wrong. From the letter:

Finally, we found no evidence to support allegations (which were raised during the course of our investigation) that the decision makers, either in bringing or dismissing the claims, were influence by the race of the defendants, or any considerations other than an assessment of the evidence and the applicable law.

OPR said that reasonable people had a reasonable disagreement over how to handle a case. They even charitably overlook the substantial evidence that Adams and the other proponents of the New Black Panthers conspiracy theory have a political motivation.

How has Adams reacted to the OPR letter? He's declaring that the "fix came in," criticizing media for supposedly only reporting on the case now that OPR is saying there was no evidence of wrongdoing, and criticizing The New York Times for reporting that "The case had been developed by an attorney hired during a period when the Bush administration ... tried to fill the division's career ranks with conservatives."

But somehow, the claim from his DOJ sources that Adams was about to be accused of racism has been flushed down the memory hole. Fancy that.

UPDATE: In a separate Pajamas Media article, Adams writes, "As reported by Pajamas here and here, the results were exactly as expected: DOJ concludes that DOJ did nothing wrong." Still no word on why his reporting that OPR would find that "the case was brought because of racial bias" turned out to be flat out wrong. Adams also calls on Congress to demand extensive information from DOJ and to conduct hearings, apparently because the hundreds of thousands of dollars wasted by the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights' investigation of the case just wasn't enough.

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