Immigration

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  • White Nationalists Praise Trump’s Muslim Ban: “God Bless You,” “Feel Like Crying” With Joy

    Blog ››› ››› ERIC HANANOKI

    White nationalists are “ecstatic” and “feel like crying” with joy over President Donald Trump’s executive order banning people from seven majority-Muslim countries from entering the United States. These virulently racist writers are praising Trump for stopping “these disgusting animals” and “sneaky sand-people” from entering the country and are also calling on Trump to arrest or impeach federal judges who oppose the ban. A neo-Nazi writer even suggested killing those protesting the ban.  

    Members of the white nationalist movement heavily supported Trump’s campaign, and the candidate, his family, and his political team courted members of the movement, including making appearances in white nationalist media, refusing to denounce them, and retweeting their messages. White nationalists celebrated when Stephen Bannon -- who made Breitbart.com "the platform for the” white nationalist “alt-right" movement -- was appointed to a senior White House role.

    Those pro-Trump writers are now “ecstatic” over his recent executive order: 

    Daily Stormer Feels “Ecstatic Joy,” Suggests Trump Should Arrest Federal Judge And Kill Protesters. The Daily Stormer is a neo-Nazi website that celebrates Hitler and frequently attacks Jewish people. The site is ecstatic over Trump’s Muslim ban.

    Writer “Azzmador” wrote a post headlined “Glorious Leader Wreaks Havoc on Filthy Moslem Would-Be Invaders.” He added (emphasis original): “Of course, it is a Muslim ban. We just can’t call it that…yet. But it’s definitely subhuman raghead heathens at the shit end of Glorious Leader’s big stick, and they are taking a walloping, bigly.” The writer concluded by hoping that Trump would put Muslims in gas chambers:

    So everything just keeps getting better and better. President Trump is working at breakneck speed to not only meet, but to exceed his campaign promises.

    It’s already been one helluva first week.                                         

    By the end of the month, we should have the rails laid, the camps built, and the gas flowing like Febreze.

    Site editor Andrew Anglin wrote that he is feeling “ecstatic joy” and feels “like crying.” From his post:

    So I’m really feeling a lot of different emotions right now. I feel ecstatic joy. I feel admiration for our GLORIOUS LEADER. I feel shame for having doubted him. I feel sadness at the loss my city has suffered. I feel rage at the people who allowed the home I knew as a child to be ravaged by these disgusting animals when they could have just as easily said “Somalians? uh, yeah, no – they’re totally banned.”

    But most of all?

    I’m feeling comfy, fam.

    And also, I feel like crying.

    God bless you, Donald Trump.

    May you never die.

    Anglin also called on Trump to “arrest treasonous federal judge Ann Donnelly for trying to flood America with terrorists” after she issued an emergency order temporarily halting Trump’s travel ban. He wrote: “I am hereby calling on Trump to issue a warrant for her arrest. … Trump needs to arrest this woman immediately and have her charged with treason. If other judges protest, he needs to declare martial law and have them all rounded up and interned. We are at war here. This isn’t a game.” He also called on Trump to raid ACLU offices “with all head figures arrested and charged with conspiracy to undermine America and the promotion of terrorism against America.”

    Anglin suggested that Trump should kill protesters in the same fashion that Ohio National Guardsmen did when they killed four students at Kent State University in 1970. He wrote: “All we need is one Kent State-style incident, and this crap is going to end real quick. But maybe putting the DC rioters in prison for ten years will do the trick.”

    Radio Host James Edwards: “God Bless You.” James Edwards is the host of the “pro-white” radio program The Political Cesspool. Edwards is a David Duke acolyte and “has probably done more than any of his contemporaries on the American radical right to publicly promote neo-Nazis, Holocaust deniers, raging anti-Semites and other extremists," according to the Southern Poverty Law Center. He tweeted of the ban:

    David Duke: “Greatest. Year. Ever. #MuslimBan.” David Duke is a white nationalist radio host and former Ku Klux Klan leader. He has praised the Muslim ban on Twitter:

    Infostormer: “I Have That Teary-Eyed Thing Going On Yet Again.” Infostormer is a neo-Nazi website that idolizes Adolf Hitler and Donald Trump. It is virulently anti-Semitic and features the prominent tag line, “Destroying Jewish Tyranny.” The site reacted with joy to the ban, writing:

    This semi-sweeping ban on Moslem animals – easy to expand to include other nations and groups in the future – is even better than I first thought (the full State Department memo will be available shortly).

    Not only have we banned citizens from seven Third-World cesspits from entering the country, but we also have covered secret backdoor methods by which the sneaky sand-people could still attempt to infiltrate the United States.

    As of yesterday, green card holders originally from the proscribed nations, as well as those trying to enter with a passport from an accepted land, such as Britain, will be given the steel-toed boot back to the squalor of Haji-Town if they cannot pass “extreme vetting” procedures.

    I don’t know about y’all, but I have that teary-eyed thing going on yet again.

    VDare: Impeach Judge Donnelly. VDare is a white nationalist site that publishes pieces demonizing immigrants. The site’s Twitter account tweeted of the ban:

    Site editor Peter Brimelow also wrote that Judge Ann Donnelly should be impeached over her “sabotage of Trump refugee order.”

  • Trump’s Wall And The Missing Media Context: Undocumented Immigration Is On The Decline

    Blog ››› ››› ERIC BOEHLERT

    In signing an executive order last week ordering the “immediate construction of a physical wall” along the United States’ border with Mexico, President Donald Trump generated exactly the news coverage he wanted: articles highlighting the president’s unprecedented action that could give the impression he’s addressing a surging problem of undocumented immigrants flooding into the United States.

    The New York Times reported that Trump had begun “a sweeping crackdown on illegal immigration.” The paper stressed, “Taken together, the moves would turn the full weight of the federal government to fortifying the United States border,” and that Trump’s plan “called for a newly expanded force to sweep up immigrants who are in the country illegally.”

    According to The Washington Post, “President Trump on Wednesday began putting in place his plan to ratchet up immigration enforcement.”

    And The Associated Press stressed that, “President Donald Trump moved aggressively to tighten the nation's immigration controls Wednesday,” noting “Trump cast his actions as fulfillment of a campaign pledge to enact hard-line immigration measures.”

    The tone of these pieces about his planned wall very much reflected Trump’s get-tough rhetoric this week: He was taking aggressive action to stem a growing problem. “Beginning today, the United States gets control of its borders,” the president said this week. He told ABC's David Muir: “It’s going to be very hard to come in. Right now, it’s very easy to come in.”

    But here’s the crucial context much of the coverage glossed over as reporters rushed to document Trump’s wall initiative: Overall the total number of undocumented immigrants living in the United States has been slightly declining over the past decade. Apprehensions at the U.S. border have generally been in decline over the past 16 years. And specifically, the number of unauthorized immigrants from Mexico who were stopped at the border has fallen in recent years, with the figure being cut in half since 2010. (There has been an increase in undocumented immigrants from Central America in recent years, but overall the total number of undocumented immigrants stopped at the border is a quarter of what it was in 2000.) 

    Like his attempts to spread lies about the U.S. unemployment rate (not to mention lies about the size of his inauguration crowd), Trump’s argument for building a wall is built on the fabrication that America is under siege from undocumented immigrants.

    It’s not.

    While some publications, like the Huffington Post and Politico, included this crucial context for Trump’s wall proposal, each of those articles cited above from the Times, the Post and Associated Press, failed to note that Trump was proposing a radical fix for a dilemma already in decline. And that seems to have been the press pattern, as news updates downplayed or ignored the slower rate of immigration across the Mexican border. This NBC report doesn’t mention it until the 16th paragraph; this CNN report made no mention of it at all.

    Clear-headed coverage that provides context for Trump’s colossal wall proposal should spell out that his multi billion-dollar construction projection is designed to address a problem that spiked 10 years ago when the total undocumented population hit an all-time high.The press shouldn’t allow Trump to paint a portrait of America being overrun when that simply is not true. 

    The failure is part of a larger problem where journalists allow Trump to create his own -- often dystopian -- realities about America. Like the way the president promised to fix the “carnage” of America during his inauguration address, and how he routinely insists the crime rate in this country is rocketing upward. 

    It’s not.

    The number of undocumented immigrants living in the United States peaked in 2007. There were 12.2 million undocumented immigrants in 2007 and 11.1 million in 2014, according to Pew Research Center estimates. (They are among the most recent figures available.) 

    Those Pew numbers were reinforced by a 2016 study by demographer Robert Warren, which found that the number of undocumented immigrants living in the U.S had dropped to 10.9 million in 2014.

    “One reason for the high and sustained level of interest in undocumented immigration is the widespread belief that the trend in the undocumented population is ever upward,” wrote Warren in his study for the Journal on Migration and Human Security. “This paper shows that this belief is mistaken and that, in fact, the undocumented population has been decreasing for more than a half a decade.”

    Trump’s signature policy initiative of building a concrete wall along a nearly 2,000-mile border with Mexico is based on a falsehood about undocumented immigrants. The press needs to include that central context.

  • Fox’s Chris Wallace Ignored Constitutional And Diplomatic Concerns Over Trump’s Muslim Ban

    Blog ››› ››› ZACHARY PLEAT

    Fox News Sunday host Chris Wallace failed to mention any of the constitutional and diplomatic problems with President Donald Trump’s executive action banning visitors, immigrants, and refugees from several Muslim-majority countries in an interview he conducted with White House counselor Kellyanne Conway about the order.

    According to CNN, the executive order “bars all persons from certain ‘terror-prone’ countries from entering the United States for 90 days and suspends the US Refugee Admissions Program for 120 days until it is reinstated ‘only for nationals of countries for whom’ members of Trump's Cabinet deem can be properly vetted.” The executive action impacts immigrants and refugees from seven majority-Muslim countries, including Iran, Iraq, Syria, Sudan, Libya, Yemen and Somalia. The order has a religious exception, giving “the Department of Homeland Security leeway to prioritize refugee claims made by people ‘on the basis of religious based persecution.’” Trump himself said he will prioritize Christians refugees over Muslims refugees in an interview with the Christian Broadcast Network.

    After Trump’s executive action caused chaos for incoming refugees and immigrants at airports nationwide, a federal judge “blocked deportations nationwide late Saturday of those detained on entry to the United States after” Trump had already signed the order.

    Many cable and network news shows on Sunday explained the array of legal and diplomatic problems associated with Trump’s order. NBC’s Chuck Todd questioned the constitutionality of green card holders reportedly also being subject to the executive order. CBS’ John Dickerson grilled White House chief of staff Reince Priebus about the diplomatic backlash of the order from allied countries. ABC’s Terry Moran explained that Trump’s insistence that Christians would receive special treatment is “probably unconstitutional under the Establishment Clause.” On CNN’s Fareed Zakaria GPS, ACLU president Anthony Romero gave a thorough explanation of how Trump’s executive order violates international treaties, several clauses and amendments of the Constitution, and federal statutes. And Republican strategist and CNN commentator Ana Navarro pointed out that the order amounts to -- and is perceived widely as -- a Muslim ban.

    Yet Wallace noted none of those constitutional and diplomatic problems in his interview with Conway. He briefly mentioned the judges that temporarily blocked some parts of the order, but neglected to explain why, and allowed Conway to dismiss the effect of the rulings on Trump’s order without any pushback. Watch Wallace’s interview of Conway about the executive order below:

  • Trump’s Immigration Order Targeting Muslims Is Greeted With Praise By Conservative Media And Dismay By Experts

    ACLU: The “Intent To Discriminate On The Basis Of Religion, Even Hidden Behind Pretextual Religious Neutrality, Violates The Establishment Clause And Equal Protection”

    ››› ››› TYLER CHERRY

    The executive action President Donald Trump has signed to limit immigration of refugees from a group of majority-Muslim countries was condemned by national security experts and media figures when he initially floated them. Those experts have noted that Trump’s plans are unconstitutional and antithetical to American values and that they would cost the U.S. billions of dollars and thousands of jobs.

  • Media Must Label Anti-Immigrant Nativists Properly

    Now That Nativists Are In The Trump Administration, Media Need To Correct Course

    Blog ››› ››› CRISTINA LóPEZ G.

    In covering President Donald Trump’s anti-immigrant proposals and new hires, some mainstream media outlets have been misleadingly identifying groups in favor of more restricted immigration as "conservative" or merely supportive of "stricter" rules, when the groups are actually nativist with members that promote the work of white nationalists.

    The “nativist lobby” is made up of the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR) -- which the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) has designated a hate group -- NumbersUSA, and the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS), among several other smaller affiliated groups. While these three groups’ ties to white supremacists and their reputation for producing shoddy research to advocate for limiting all forms of immigration are well-documented, media outlets have sanitized their image by repeatedly referencing them and citing their work without mentioning their associations with nativism and white nationalism.

    In the past week alone, several mainstream outlets continued to help normalize these organizations -- specifically the Center for Immigration Studies -- by allowing them to pass as mainstream conservative organizations with a valid seat at the table in the immigration policy conversation. The Washington Post referred to CIS as “a conservative group that calls for added immigration restrictions,” USA Today identified CIS as an institution that “favors stricter control on immigration,” The Tampa Bay Times called it a “Washington D.C., think tank that favors stricter immigration policies,” while the Financial Times took the group’s word, calling it a “self-described ‘low-immigration, pro-immigrant,’” center.

    These characterizations fail to provide not only a full picture of the groups’ nativist, white nationalist ties but also their true intentions, which their "racist architect" John Tanton describes as a “European-American majority, and a clear one at that.” Even some conservatives are hesitant to attach to these organizations, rejecting their extremism and saying they “loathe the Tanton network.” For example, Neil Stevens of the conservative outlet Red State, recently condemned CIS for pushing white-nationalist literature and called on conservatives to “stop pretending CIS and FAIR are groups we can work with, since the last thing we need is to poison our movement.” It might be too late for that, judging from the number of figures linked to these groups currently joining the conservative-backed Republican administration.

    As Trump taps members and supporters of these organizations for his administration or lets them influence its policies, media have a greater responsibility to properly identify these groups and their members, specifically:

    • Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach -- who works as legal counsel to the legal arm of FAIR, the Immigration Reform Law Institute (IRLI) -- influenced Trump’s first two anti-immigration executive orders. 

    • The former executive director of FAIR, Julie Kirchner, is set to become chief of staff at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

    • Trump’s pick for attorney general, Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL), was the keynote speaker at FAIR’s advisory board meeting and has credited the organization for helping sink bipartisan plans for immigration reform.

    • Jon Feere, reportedly a potential Department of Homeland Security hire, has a record that includes promoting the work of a white nationalist website and was a legal policy analyst for CIS.

    Given Trump’s recent executive orders and indications that he will be adopting these groups’ ideas it has become imperative for the press to correct course and provide an accurate, full picture of their affiliations and motivations.

  • Internet Trolls Are Trying To Get Undocumented Immigrants Rounded Up And Deported

    4chan User: “Don’t Be Cucks This Is Easy Damage”

    Blog ››› ››› MEDIA MATTERS STAFF

    Users on the anonymous forum 4chan encouraged others to trick Twitter users into publicly outing themselves as undocumented immigrants in the United States so they could be reported to the federal government for deportation.

    On January 21, 4chan users responded en masse to a post on the website’s “Politically Incorrect” forum that contained an alleged screenshot of a nonexistent CNN story that said President Donald Trump created a website to “report illegal immigrants.” The faux screengrab also contained an image of a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) tip form. Several users suggested using Twitter searches to find Twitter accounts belonging to undocumented immigrants and using those tweets to report people for deportation.

    On January 26, users on the message board announced that they planned to get the hashtag “#UndocumentedUnafraid” trending on Twitter in order to trick undocumented immigrants into admitting their status so 4chan members could report them to the authorities.

    In the now archived thread, 4chan users encouraged trying to “bait them into revealing their location.” One user even suggested making up “a fake pro-immigration organization” that could “put up a $500 scholarship for undocumented students” so that people would “admit to being illegal explicitly.” The user claimed that if “the bar was low enough,” someone could “easily catch hundreds and get their contact info.” Another user added, “Don't be cucks this is easy damage.”

    Rewire immigration reporter Tina Vasquez and other activists warned their followers about the 4chan posts online:

    Even with the increased attention, organizers on the forum still encouraged users to “keep it going” because “even if they warn people about it, there will be people who take the bait once the Hashtag is trending.”

    4chan users on the “Politically Incorrect” message board have a history of hyping fake news stories and engaging in online harassment. In 2016, users on the board played an instrumental role in the propagation of the debunked “Pizzagate” conspiracy theory, which ultimately prompted an man to fire a gun inside a Washington, D.C., pizzeria. More recently, users have targeted actor Shia LaBeouf for his livestream anti-Trump protest project “He Will Not Divide Us” by “harassing anti-Trump protesters as they appear on the stream” and “threaten[ing] LaBeouf directly.”

  • Potential DHS Hire Jon Feere Promoted Anti-Immigrant White Nationalist Website

    Feere Also Discussed Immigration In Interview With Holocaust-Denying Anti-Semitic Website

    Blog ››› ››› ERIC HANANOKI

    Policy analyst Jon Feere, who is reportedly “in line” to join the Trump administration, has promoted the work of the white nationalist website VDare.com and given an interview about immigration to an anti-Semitic newspaper that promotes claims that the Holocaust is a “hoax.”

    The Washington Post reported that Feere “is in line to join the Trump administration in an immigration-related position at the Department of Homeland Security, according to two former U.S. officials informed of transition changes by department personnel.” The paper noted that Feere is a “prominent advocate of ending U.S. birthright citizenship” and has worked as a legal policy analyst for the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS).

    CIS is an anti-immigrant group founded by John Tanton, a white nationalist who has claimed that “a European-American majority” is required to maintain American culture. The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) has heavily criticized the nativist group for releasing shoddy research and pushing misinformation about immigrants.

    Feere wrote on Twitter that the “reality is that many pro-illegal immigration people simply hate Americans and believe that foreigners are superior in every way.”

    Feere has also promoted the work of the white nationalist anti-immigrant site VDare on his Twitter account. He linked to an article on the site in an April 9, 2016, tweet:

    The VDare article claimed that it’s “deeply disturbing the lengths to which honest citizens must go to convince the government to do its basic job of protecting us from violent foreigners -- from killer jihadists to all-too-common drunk-driving illegal aliens.” VDare added that “citizens are expected to accept lesser status than that of illegal aliens, who are favored by leftists as friendly to oversized government and comfortable with gangster-style politics.”

    VDare states that it “is named after Virginia Dare, the first English child to be born in the New World.” The website is run by prominent white nationalist Peter Brimelow.

    Civil rights groups have heavily criticized VDare.com. SPLC wrote that it is a white nationalist website that “regularly publishes articles by prominent white nationalists, race scientists and anti-Semites.” The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) described VDare.com as a “racist, anti-immigrant site.”

    Numerous media outlets have correctly identified the site as white nationalist, including The Washington Post, The New York TimesThe Associated Press, and CNN.

    When a Twitter user criticized Feere for linking to the white nationalist website, Feere replied: “It's simply the most link-filled account of the killing, allowing people to read other Boston newspapers via one link.”

    Feere also discussed immigration in a May 2012 interview with the anti-Semitic publication American Free Press. The May 28, 2012, piece is headlined “‘Big Ag’ Favors Illegal Immigration,” and it notes that Feere spoke with American Free Press:

    In an attempt to dissuade other states from following suit, Big Ag has embarked upon a ruthless media campaign, insisting that the recently enacted legislation has crippled the growth of the fruit and vegetable industry and left farmers with no qualified pickers to harvest their crops.

    “These businesses make claims that they have produce rotting on the vines, but there’s very little evidence of it,” said Jon Feere, a legal policy analyst with the Center for Immigration Studies, who recently spoke with AFP. “If there’s produce to be pulled, they’re going to find a way to do it. That means paying a better wage that attracts a legal workforce. In many of these states, unemployment is at an all-time high. So to suggest there are no willing workers is just silly.”

    Contrary to an oft-recited cliché, said Feere: “There is no job that Americans can’t do. What these businesses are really saying is that they can’t find willing workers to pull produce at the wages they’re willing to offer.”

    Feere goes on to say that even if farms did have trouble finding workers, other options are still available. “Most industries can be mechanized so that fewer humans are needed for harvesting,” he said. “However, there are some upfront costs to mechanization, and businesses have been unwilling to invest in the needed technology because they assume there will be a continuous supply of cheap, exploitable labor.”

    Concerns that a higher wage will drive up food prices are unfounded. According to Feere: “We’ve learned that the average labor cost for a piece of produce is somewhere around three cents to a dollar. These businesses could actually double the wages they were offering and you really wouldn’t see more than a few pennies tacked on.”

    After the article ran, the ADL criticized Feere for “associating” “with anti-Semites,” writing that American Free Press is a “conspiracy-oriented anti-Semitic newspaper run by long-time anti-Semite and Holocaust denier, Willis Carto.” SPLC also criticized Feere for granting “an interview to the anti-Semitic newspaper.”

    American Free Press promotes Holocaust denial and anti-Semitism. On March 21, 2012, it promoted the book The Holocaust Hoax Exposed: Debunking the 20th Century’s Biggest Lie. The website praised the book for purportedly ripping “apart, in lay language, the veil-thin arguments used to prove the Jewish ‘Holocaust,’ which is then used by global Zionists to justify the creation and continued existence of the state of Israel and as a tool to silence all critics.”

  • White Nationalists And Nativists Want Americans To Pay To Keep America White

    Trump Adviser Kris Kobach, Who Has Nativist Ties, Helped Write Executive Orders

    Blog ››› ››› SALVATORE COLLELUORI

    Media should be aware that white nationalist and anti-immigrant groups are rallying around President Donald Trump’s new executive orders on immigration. Republicans like Kansas Secretary of State and radio host Kris Kobach and Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions have embraced these nativist groups and pushed their colleagues in the GOP to prioritize costly anti-immigrant enforcement measures over traditional fiscal conservatism. And that means Americans will have to foot the extremely high bill of trying to keep America white and immigrants out.

    On January 25, Trump signed two executive orders which, along with a third that’s expected soon, seek to ban immigrants from predominantly Muslim countries in the Middle East and Africa from entering the United States, begin efforts to build a wall on the United States’ southern border with Mexico, re-establish programs that allow local law enforcement officials to act as de facto immigration agents, and threaten federal government funding of so-called “sanctuary cities,” which, according to The New York Times, are “jurisdictions that limit their cooperation with federal authorities seeking to detain unauthorized immigrants.”

    None of these ideas are new. Tightening border enforcement measures, attacking pro-immigrant cities, and pushing local law enforcement to act as immigration police are all ideas that have been promoted by the anti-immigrant, nativist, and white supremacist right for decades. But now they’ve finally found an ally in the Oval Office.

    This should come as no surprise, as several of the biggest proponents of these harsh immigration policies are advisers to Trump or nominees to his cabinet. According to The Wichita Eagle, Trump adviser and Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach was involved in the early stages of drafting  the executive orders. According to the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), Kobach has served as counsel to the legal arm of the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR), known as the Immigration Reform Law Institute (IRLI), since 2004. On January 23, officials announced that Julie Kirchner, the former executive director of FAIR, an SPLC-designated hate group “whose leaders have historical ties to white supremacists and eugenicists,” was also joining the Trump administration, as chief of staff at U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

    FAIR is also a favored organization of Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL), Trump’s nominee for attorney general. In 2007, Sessions was the keynote speaker at the group’s advisory board meeting and publicly thanked the organization for helping defeat a bipartisan immigration reform plan. Sessions is also a regular at other events hosted by the organization, including its annual lobby day on Capitol Hill, dubbed Hold Their Feet To The Fire

    FAIR, the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS), and NumbersUSA -- three of the biggest nativist groups in the country -- have made thinly veiled attempts to hide their nativist and white supremacist ties. While media outlets often highlight them as groups that merely favor increased immigration enforcement or want to crack down on undocumented immigrants, that’s far from the whole story. According to SPLC, CIS has distributed anti-immigration articles from Jared Taylor of the white nationalist website American Renaissance and Holocaust denier John Friend and held events with Charles Murray, a white nationalist who wrote a book “that uses racist pseudoscience and misleading statistics to argue that social inequality is caused by the genetic inferiority of black and Latino communities.” FAIR and NumbersUSA have also courted white supremacists and white nationalists, including via FAIR president Dan Stein’s association with the nativist hate journal The Social Contract and NumbersUSA’s courting of the white supremacist Council of Conservative Citizens.

    With Trump’s victory, these anti-immigrant nativists are finally getting an opportunity to attempt to fulfill their dream of keeping America white and immigrant-free by pushing government to spend potentially $31.2 billion on a flawed border wall and unnecessarily deputizing local law enforcement to crack down on immigrants, even though no evidence shows that the policy has ever actually deterred crime. And the real kicker is that taxpayers are going to have to foot the bill for these costly, unnecessary, and flawed plans that a majority of them don’t support.

    Now, as Republicans are faced with funding a multibillion-dollar wall that is not supported by a majority of Americans, and most likely won’t be paid for by Mexico, will they fulfill the nativist and white supremacist dream or will they stay true to their supposed roots of fiscal conservatism?

    Research intern Katherine Hess contributed research to this piece.