AP again reported McCain "didn't embrace the [bitch] epithet" without noting that he called the question "excellent"

››› ››› LAUREN AUERBACH

Associated Press reporter Liz Sidoti wrote: "Last fall, [Sen. John] McCain faced criticism for initially not repudiating a voter in South Carolina who called [Sen. Hillary Rodham] Clinton a 'bitch.' McCain chuckled in response to the voter's question, but didn't embrace the epithet." Sidoti further reported: "A few minutes later, [McCain] said he respected Clinton, a New York senator and colleague." However, Sidoti made no mention of the fact that McCain first called the question "excellent" and then pointed to a Rasmussen poll that he said showed him beating Clinton in a head-to-head matchup.

In a February 26 article on Sen. John McCain's apology for radio host Bill Cunningham's recent comments at a McCain campaign event in Ohio, Associated Press reporter Liz Sidoti wrote: "Last fall, McCain faced criticism for initially not repudiating a voter in South Carolina who called [Sen. Hillary Rodham] Clinton a 'bitch.' McCain chuckled in response to the voter's question, but didn't embrace the epithet." Sidoti further reported: "A few minutes later, [McCain] said he respected Clinton, a New York senator and colleague." That incident took place during a campaign event in Hilton Head, South Carolina, in which a questioner asked McCain: "How do we beat the bitch?" However, Sidoti made no mention of the fact that McCain first called the question "excellent" and then pointed to a Rasmussen poll that he said showed him beating Clinton in a head-to-head matchup before saying, "I respect Senator Clinton. I respect anyone who gets the nomination of the Democrat [sic] Party." In fact, McCain's first response to the question was: "May I give ... the translation?" He then added: "But that's an excellent question," before mentioning the Rasmussen poll. Only then did McCain state that he had "respect" for Clinton.

As Media Matters for America previously documented, both the AP and The Hill previously reported on the incident without noting that McCain said that it was an "excellent question."

From the February 27 Associated Press article:

Responding to McCain's apology, Obama spokesman Bill Burton said, "It is a sign that if there is a McCain-Obama general election, it can be intensely competitive but the candidates will attempt to keep it respectful and focused on issues."

Last fall, McCain faced criticism for initially not repudiating a voter in South Carolina who called Clinton a "bitch." McCain chuckled in response to the voter's question, but didn't embrace the epithet. A few minutes later, he said he respected Clinton, a New York senator and colleague.

Aside from using Obama's middle name, [conservative radio host Bill] Cunningham also mocked the Illinois senator's foreign policy statements about his willingness to meet with the leaders of rogue nations. He said he envisions a future in which "the great prophet from Chicago takes the stand and the world leaders who want to kill us will simply be singing Kumbaya together around the table with Barack Obama."

Posted In
Diversity & Discrimination, Gender
Network/Outlet
Associated Press
Stories/Interests
John McCain, 2008 Elections
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