AP cited McCain's immigration record as evidence that he "has worked with Democrats," but didn't note that he now opposes own bill

››› ››› LAUREN AUERBACH

The AP reported that Sen. John McCain "has worked with Democrats on legislation" such as "redrafting immigration rules and regulations" and that this work with Democrats "has cultivated a maverick image for McCain." But the AP did not note that McCain said on January 30 that he would no longer support his own comprehensive immigration reform bill if it came up for a vote in the Senate.

A May 15 Associated Press article reported that Sen. John McCain "has worked with Democrats on legislation" such as "redrafting immigration rules and regulations" and that this work with Democrats "has cultivated a maverick image for McCain." But the AP did not note that McCain said on January 30 that he would no longer support his own comprehensive immigration reform bill if it came up for a vote in the Senate. Additionally, McCain has reversed himself on the issue of border security; he now says that "we've got to secure the borders first" -- a position at odds with his prior assertion that border security could not be disaggregated from other aspects of comprehensive immigration reform without being rendered ineffective.

McCain has also reversed his position on the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act, the 2007 version of which would have allowed certain illegal immigrants under age 30 who had entered the country before age 16 to remain in the United States and gain legal status if they attend college or join the military. Twelve Republican senators voted in favor of the 2007 version of the bill, which had two Republican co-sponsors.

As Media Matters for America has documented, the AP has repeatedly reported that McCain supports immigration reform without noting his reversals. Media Matters has also documented the broadcast and print media's habit of using the label "maverick" when discussing McCain.

From the May 15 AP article:

"I'm not interested in partisanship that serves no other purpose than to gain a temporary advantage over our opponents. This mindless, paralyzing rancor must come to an end. We belong to different parties, not different countries," McCain says in remarks prepared for delivery in the capital city of Ohio, a general election battleground. "There is a time to campaign, and a time to govern. If I'm elected president, the era of the permanent campaign will end; the era of problem solving will begin."

To the disdain of some fellow Republicans, the presumed GOP nominee has worked with Democrats on legislation aimed at overhauling campaign finance regulations, redrafting immigration rules and regulations and implementing government spending controls.

While that has cultivated a maverick image for McCain, the Arizona senator has also been accused of exhibiting a nasty temper -- swearing even at fellow lawmakers from his own party -- and unabashed partisanship.

In particular, McCain has clashed with the leading Democratic presidential contender, Barack Obama. After tangling with the Illinois senator on lobbying reforms, McCain questioned Obama's integrity in a publicly released 2006 letter.

Posted In
Immigration
Network/Outlet
Associated Press
Stories/Interests
John McCain, 2008 Elections
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