"Feminist" Marc Rudov believes "most American women are as shallow" as Sex in the City characters

››› ››› DIANNA PARKER

On The O'Reilly Factor, Marc Rudov said men should boycott the Sex and the City movie and would not see it because "paying to hear women whine is as stupid as paying for cobwebs, because you can get them both at home for free." When Bill O'Reilly asked Margaret Hoover whether she believed "that most American women are as shallow as" the four main characters in the movie, Rudov interrupted: "I do."

On the May 30 edition of Fox News' The O'Reilly Factor, while discussing the new Sex and the City movie, author and self-described "feminist" Marc Rudov said men should boycott the movie and would not see it because "paying to hear women whine is as stupid as paying for cobwebs, because you can get them both at home for free." When host Bill O'Reilly challenged Rudov's assertion that the movie was "Woodstock for entitled princesses" and asked Fox News analyst Margaret Hoover whether she believed "that most American women are as shallow as" the four main characters in the movie, Rudov interrupted: "I do."

Rudov's criticisms of the movie echoed comments he made earlier that day on Your World with Neil Cavuto, on which he sparred with Fox News legal analyst Lis Wiehl over whether the women in the movie were "whining." The segment was accompanied by on-screen text reading "Rudov: Men Hear Enough Whining at Home." Rudov said that "this movie shows women at their worst. They're conniving, they're manipulative, they're miserable, they're complaining all the time; who wants to pay to see that?" He later said, "[A]ll the women recognize themselves on the screen, and that's why they want to go."

As Media Matters for America noted, on the April 10 edition of Your World, Rudov referred to this country as a "gynocracy" and said of Sen. Hillary Clinton: "The woman is not called a B-word because she's assertive and aggressive; she's called a B-word because she acts like one." On the April 10 edition of The O'Reilly Factor, Rudov stated that one reason "the beauty pageant industry is failing" is because "the contestants are supposed to be good girls, and there aren't good girls," later adding: "Girls just love to expose themselves." On the March 26 edition of The O'Reilly Factor, Rudov stated: "You know, you started talking about female happiness before, would women be happier and why our men are depressed. Men are depressed, and it's their own fault, because men are allowing women to take over the world. You know, female happiness is an oxymoron." During the March 10 edition of The O'Reilly Factor, when O'Reilly asked about the "downside" of a woman president, Rudov responded: "You mean besides the PMS and the mood swings, right?" On the January 4 edition of Your World, Rudov said: "When Barack Obama speaks, men hear, 'Take off for the future.' And when Hillary Clinton speaks, men hear, 'Take out the garbage.' "

From the May 30 edition of Fox News' The O'Reilly Factor:

HOOVER: I was forced, kicking and screaming. I got to tell you, the movie really redeemed itself from the series. I find the series to be sort of shallow and superficial, sort of women who really can't fill the holes in their soul with the materialistic items they buy every day and the new brands they wear. But the movie really redeemed itself. Suddenly, it's not about all the hoopla and the marriage and materialistic items. It's actually about, well, the marriage, rather than all the show.

O'REILLY: OK.

HOOVER: So, the movie really redeems itself -- not as superficial as the series.

O'REILLY: Now, you just convinced me even more not to go to see it. I have no interest. If it were shallow, I definitely would have gone.

HOOVER: But there's plenty of --

O'REILLY: But if there is a social redeeming part of that film, Margaret, I want no part of it.

Now, Rudov, I just heard you with Cavuto a few hours ago say that the reason women go to see this movie is because they see themselves on the screen. I disagree.

RUDOV: Right.

O'REILLY: I believe the reason women go to see this movie -- and I'm not kidding around now -- are because of the clothes, the shoes, the gossiping about men and the overall tone of dish, D-I-S-H. That's why they go. I don't think very many American women identify with these four.

RUDOV: Oh, come on, Bill. You have to be kidding. That's exactly what women do, and that's why they would see themselves in this movie. And that's exactly why men would not go see it, because paying to hear women whine is as stupid as paying for cobwebs, because you can get them both at home for free. This movie to men --

O'REILLY: Depends where you live, Marc. Maybe in your house, but there's -- my house is a no-whining zone.

RUDOV: This is -- no, no, no. I don't tolerate this. This movie is the cinematic equivalent to ipecac. It's Woodstock for entitled princesses.

O'REILLY: But Marc, come on. You've got --

RUDOV: But instead of being about the blues, it's about the shoes. Come on.

O'REILLY: Look, most American women are not entitled princesses. They're not.

RUDOV: Oh, yes they are, Bill.

O'REILLY: This is -- no, no, no. This is an ur--

RUDOV: Oh, yes they are.

O'REILLY: Look -- where you live in San Francisco, that might be the case.

RUDOV: I don't live in San Francisco.

O'REILLY: Here in Manhattan where I am, there is a bi-- you get out with the real folks. These people are aliens, and that's another attraction for women. They see this kind of behavior that they never see, Margaret. They never see these crazy people --

RUDOV: Margaret, Margaret.

O'REILLY: -- in Jefferson, Missouri.

RUDOV: Margaret, how often -- Margaret -- when you go out a date with a man, Margaret, do you expect him to pay?

HOOVER: You know what, Marc? It goes both ways. Here's the catch. I unfortunately wish --

RUDOV: Do you expect him to pay, Margaret? I know you do.

O'REILLY: All right, Marc, she just asked -- she just answered it.

HOOVER: Sometimes I do. Sometimes I do. Sometimes I pay. Here's the bottom line, Marc. Women, unfortunately -- and Marc's right here, Bill -- a lot of women go to see this movie because they identify with these women, and that's unfortunate. Because these women in this series and in the movie to a certain extent are really sort of -- have low self-confidence, are looking to really fill their emotional lacking with materialistic items, and that's really unfortunate.

O'REILLY: OK.

HOOVER: I wish these women were --

O'REILLY: If that were the case, then this on television -- this HBO series would have gotten 10 times as many viewers as it got. This is a niche --

HOOVER: But it got a lot of viewers. And there are a lot of women --

O'REILLY: No, it didn't get a lot of viewers.

HOOVER: -- that really like this movie. I'm with you. I don't like it.

O'REILLY: In the big scheme of things it did not. It did not.

RUDOV: Bill, that's not the reason.

HOOVER: The reason -- the reason --

RUDOV: The reason is because not all of Americans get HBO. But if you don't think that this movie accurately reflects the way most women behave, then your, you know, Long Island, there's something funny going on there because --

[crosstalk]

HOOVER: Most women don't go out and sleep around every night. This is not how women act.

O'REILLY: It's a certain urban segment of our society. It does not reflect the mainstream women in America. It doesn't.

HOOVER: And it's -- and Bill, even more than that, it's a glorification of a certain urban segment of American society, which is not how most Americans live and not how most women live. Look --

O'REILLY: Are you agreeing or disagreeing with me, Hoover? I can't tell what you're doing tonight.

HOOVER: I'm disagreeing with you, Bill. I'm disagreeing with you.

O'REILLY: You're disagreeing with me. All right.

HOOVER: I'm disagreeing with you.

O'REILLY: You believe that most American women are as shallow as those four?

HOOVER: No, no, no.

RUDOV: I do.

From the May 30 edition of Fox News' Your World with Neil Cavuto:

CAVUTO: Boycott Sex and the City? My next guest telling men to stay far away from what he calls the "chick flick." Marc Rudov says he hears whining at home for free, so why pay for it at the theater? Lis Wiehl says she can't wait to see the movie and is delighted that Marc won't be there.

WIEHL: Yes.

CAVUTO: All right, so, Marc, that's a little cruel, don't you think?

RUDOV: Oh, gee, Neil. Paying to hear women whine is as dumb as paying for cobwebs -- if you just sit at home you can get both for free. This movie is the cinematic equivalent to ipecac. It's Woodstock for entitled princesses. But instead of being about the blues, it's about the shoes.

[...]

CAVUTO: Now, Marc, explain your position.

RUDOV: Well, look, this movie shows women at their worst. They're conniving, they're manipulative, they're miserable, they're complaining all the time; who wants to pay to see that? I mean, come on, and any man who allows himself to get dragged to this movie, the title of his life should be "sex out of pity."

WIEHL: Oh, sorry. First of all.

CAVUTO: That's not necessary. That's not necessary.

WIEHL: First off all, some men are going to want to go, you know, just because -- you know, Marc, maybe you're shocked that no one's asking you to go to it. But a lot of women are gonna say the guys are going to want to go with the women just to be with the women.

[crosstalk]

CAVUTO: But, Lis, why do women like this so much?

[crosstalk]

RUDOV: Neil, do you want to go?

CAVUTO: No, I don't. But, it has nothing to do whether they're whining or not, it's stupid.

RUDOV: It does, it does. It's all about whining.

[crosstalk]

CAVUTO: All right, all right. But, Lis, why do you go? Lis, you're one of the smartest -- Lis, you're one of the smartest people I know. Wicked smart. Wicked smart.

WIEHL: Wicked smart.

CAVUTO: And yet you're going to this thing that -- it just seems stupid to me. So, what's the draw?

RUDOV: Thank you, Neil.

WIEHL: It's fun, you've got strong women who are --

RUDOV: They're not strong.

WIEHL: -- the guys are kind of just boy toys; they're really not the big part of the whole thing. It's these women, their friendships, one of them gets cancer. I mean, there are so many different issues going on that you can't say that this is about whining. It's about female bonding.

CAVUTO: Oh, there's depth. So, Marc there's depth there. There's depth, and you're missing that.

RUDOV: Oh yeah, there's depth and the depth goes underground. Shoes and hats is not depth. I'm sorry -- whining, complaining --

[crosstalk]

CAVUTO: Well, Marc, what movie are you watching this weekend?

RUDOV: I don't know, I haven't figured it out yet.

[...]

CAVUTO: All right, well, you know, Marc, it's going to make a lot of money this weekend probably.

RUDOV: Right. Of course.

CAVUTO: It can't be all women seeing it.

WIEHL: That's right.

RUDOV: Well, all the women recognize themselves on the screen, and that's why they want to go.

Posted In
Diversity & Discrimination, Gender
Network/Outlet
Fox News Channel
Person
Marc Rudov
Show/Publication
The O'Reilly Factor, Your World w/ Neil Cavuto
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