Hannity fabricates Obama adviser's remarks on Sharia law to paint her as radical

››› ››› ERIC HANANOKI

During the October 15 edition of his Fox News program, Sean Hannity distorted remarks by Dalia Mogahed, a member of the President's Advisory Council on Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, by claiming that Mogahed shared "thoughts about spreading Sharia law" on a British television channel and falsely suggesting that Mogahed said that "[t]here's a lot of Americans who think Muslim countries should be governed by Sharia law." In fact, Mogahed said that she was "sure there are people out there" who believe that "the United States and Britain and other countries should be open to, the concept of, you know, integrating Sharia into laws in Muslim-majority societies"; during the exchange, she did not discuss what "a lot of Americans ... think" about Sharia law.

Hannity falsely suggests Mogahed said "[t]here's a lot of Americans who think Muslim countries should be governed by Sharia law"

In the clip Hannity aired, Mogahed did not say what Hannity said she said. Discussing Mogahed's appearance on the Islam Channel's Muslimah Dilemma, Hannity played remarks from Mogahed and claimed she said that "[t]here's a lot of Americans who think Muslim countries should be governed by Sharia law. ... I sure hope she's not passing that along to President Obama." In fact, Mogahed did not say that in the clip.

From the October 15 edition of Fox News' Hannity:

HANNITY: Now, the Obama adviser Dalia Mogahed appeared on the network's program Muslim Dilemma and shared the following thoughts about spreading Sharia law. Take a look at this.

MOGAHED [video clip]: I'm sure there are people out there who -- in fact, and they're not all Muslim -- who believe that this is something that the United States and Britain and other countries should be open to, the concept of, you know, integrating Sharia into laws in Muslim-majority societies. And, of course, most Muslim-majority societies do have Sharia as a part of their laws already.

HANNITY: What? There's a lot of Americans who think Muslim countries should be governed by Sharia law?

Now, I don't know where Miss Mogahed is getting her information, but I sure hope she's not passing that along to President Obama.

Mogahed made clear that she sees her job as conveying Muslim opinion, not engaging in advocacy

Mogahed: "[M]y role is not one of a lobbyist; it's one of a researcher." During Mogahed's appearance on Muslimah Dilemma, a caller to the program asked how Mogahed could "use her role to make people in America accept that not everybody wants to live their way and accept the law in a Muslim land." Mogahed responded: "I think what my role is, is very clear to me: to convey to the advisory council and through the advisory council to the president and to other public officials what it is Muslims want. I'm not here to advocate for one point of view or another, I'm simply a researcher who is able to convey accurately and in a representative way the actual views of Muslims so that they're speaking for themselves rather than having others speak for them." She went on to state, "[M]y role is not one of a lobbyist; it's one of a researcher."

From Mogahed's interview on the Islam Channel's Muslimah Dilemma (the portion Hannity aired is bolded):

IBTIHAL ISMAIL BSIS (host): OK. Insha'Allah. I've got a -- masha'Allah -- a live caller on already who wants to ask you a question. I've got sister Sami on the line. Salaam Alaykum, sister Sami, and thank you for being with us on Muslimah Dilemma.

CALLER: Wa Alaykum Salaam. I have a quick question for Dalia.

ISMAIL BSIS: [speaking Arabic]

CALLER: Obviously, you know, those guests were saying there is a growing desire for Muslims to live under Sharia law. My question is, how can Dalia use her role to make people in America accept that not everybody wants to live their way and accept the law in a Muslim land?

ISMAIL BSIS: OK. Insha'Allah. That's a really good question. Why didn't I think of that? Dalia?

MOGAHED: Well, I think what my role is, is very clear to me: to convey to the advisory council and through the advisory council to the president and to other public officials what it is Muslims want. I'm not here to advocate for one point of view or another, I'm simply a researcher who is able to convey accurately and in a representative way the actual views of Muslims so that they're speaking for themselves rather than having others speak for them.

It will -- it's going to have to be up to other people who are advocates, who do have a specific point of view to, you know, to push a specific policy forward or another. But my role is not one of a lobbyist; it's one of a researcher.

ISMAIL BSIS: Can I ask you, who do you think those specific people that you mentioned should be, that bring over their particular view or try and push particular ideas?

MOGAHED: Well, you know, it would be difficult for me to name exact --

ISMAIL BSIS: OK.

MOGAHED: -- you know, specific groups or specific people. But I'm sure there are people out there, who -- in fact, and they're not all Muslim -- who believe that this is something that the United States and Britain and other countries should be open to, the concept of, you know, integrating Sharia into laws in Muslim-majority societies. And, of course, most Muslim-majority societies do have Sharia as a part of their laws already.

Network/Outlet
Fox News Channel
Person
Sean Hannity
Show/Publication
Hannity
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