James Edwards

Tags ››› James Edwards
  • What Is The “Alt-Right”? A Guide To The White Nationalist Movement Now Leading Conservative Media

    Blog ››› ››› OLIVER WILLIS

    Over the last few months, the so-called “alt-right” has become one of the most prominent factions of the conservative media. The movement’s leading outlet is Breitbart News, whose chairman, Stephen Bannon, has just become the CEO of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign.

    In many ways the “alt-right” is a rebranding of classic white nationalism for the 21st century. As BuzzFeed described the movement: “In short, it’s white supremacy perfectly tailored for our times: 4chan-esque racist rhetoric combined with a tinge of Silicon Valley–flavored philosophizing, all riding on the coattails of the Trump boom.”

    The “alt-right” opposes diversity and immigration, arguing that those policies are a form of “white genocide.” It embraces racism, sexism, anti-Muslim bigotry, and anti-Semitism and sees its goal as usurping the traditional conservative movement, which it views as feckless and weak, in favor of a brand of nationalism.

    With the ascension of Trump, the “alt-right’s” chosen candidate, as the nominee of the Republican Party, its mission is all but accomplished.

    The following is a survey of the key concepts of the “alt-right,” the major figures and media outlets in the movement, and reaction to the "alt-right."

     

    Key Concepts

    “White Genocide”

    “Cuckservatives”

     

    Key Players

    Richard Spencer, The “Alt-Right’s” Racist Founder

    Stephen Bannon And Breitbart News

    Milo Yiannopoulos

    American Renaissance

    VDare.com

    The Daily Stormer

    The Political Cesspool

    The Right Stuff

    Mike Cernovich

     

    Reactions To The “Alt-Right”

    Traditional Conservative Pushback And Support

    Mainstreaming The “Alt-Right”

     

    Key Concepts

    “White Genocide”

    A popular concept with the "alt-right" is the idea of “white genocide,” a conspiracy theory claiming that efforts to increase diversity (often via immigration) are actually attempts to decrease the white population. The Anti-Defamation League notes that the alt-right favors “propaganda on subjects such as immigration and ‘black crime’ as ‘evidence’ of this ostensible ethnic cleansing of whites.”

    Conservative columnist Ann Coulter, a leading Trump supporter, has invoked this notion on her Twitter account, writing, “‘Diversity’ = nonwhite; ‘White supremacist’ = Not anti-white.” Coulter has also cited the work of the white nationalist site VDare.com and its editor, Peter Brimelow, in her anti-immigration book Adios America. The book has been praised and promoted by Trump.

    In January, Trump retweeted a post from a Twitter account with the handle “WhiteGenocideTM” and a feed that CNN.com described as “largely a collection of retweets about violence allegedly committed by African-American suspects and anti-Arab posts.” It was one of several instances of the candidate reposting material from white supremacists.

    The alt-right also launched a hashtag campaign on social media, #BoycottStarWarsVII, protesting the casting of African-American and female actors in the lead roles of the latest film in the George Lucas franchise. One Twitter user wrote, “#BoycottStarWarsVII because it is anti-white propaganda promoting #whitegenocide.” “The Force Awakens” went on to become the highest grossing domestic film of all time.

    Mother Jones noted that The Investigative Fund, a nonprofit that supports investigative reporting, conducted a Twitter analysis and found that “While only 5 percent of key influencers using the supremacist hashtag #whitegenocide follow the National Review, and 10 percent follow the Daily Caller, 31 percent follow Breitbart.”

    “Cuckservatives”

    The alt-right has branded conservatives who deviate from their racist and sexist message as “cuckservatives,” a melding of the words conservative and cuckold (the husband of an unfaithful wife). The New Republic explained, “The term has emerged out of the white supremacist movement as a term of abuse for white conservatives deemed race traitors unwilling to forthrightly defend the interests of white America.”

    National Review writer David French was attacked by alt-right supporters for having adopted an Ethiopian child. He notes that he was given a “‘Cucky’ award for adopting a black child.”

    Breitbart News defended “cuckservative” as “a gloriously effective insult,” while conservative radio host Erick Erickson said, “The people who use the term ‘cuckservative’ are racists, not conservative, and not Christian.”

    Key Players

    Richard Spencer, The Alt-Right’s Racist Founder

    The New Yorker reported that the term “alt-right” was coined by white nationalist Richard Spencer, who “described the movement in December as ‘an ideology around identity, European identity.’” The Anti-Defamation League described Spencer as “a symbol of a new generation of intellectual white supremacists” who “runs a variety of ventures that promote racist ideology.”

    Spencer has said, “There are races who, on average, are going to be superior.”

    Spencer is also the president of the National Policy Institute, a white nationalist “think tank” that held an event at the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, D.C., this March focused on Trump. He told the local CBS affiliate that Trump is “energizing” the white nationalist movement and argued, “He's fighting for us. He's saying we're going to be great again. We're going to win again. And there's this implicit identity to this. There's this implicit nationalism.”

    Spencer founded the white nationalist websites Alternative Right and Radix Journal. One writer at Alternative Right wrote that “low-IQ Mexican immigration is the greatest threat to America,” and that “we should be heartened that white teenage girls aren’t passing themselves around in black neighborhoods.”

    Stephen Bannon And Breitbart News

    Spencer said Breitbart News “has elective affinities with the Alt Right, and the Alt Right has clearly influenced Breitbart” and described the site as a “gateway” to that movement’s “ideas and writers.” He described Bannon’s new role in the Trump campaign as “a good thing” for white nationalists.

    Bannon told Mother Jones that Breitbart News is “the platform for the alt-right.”

    Bannon took over as chairman of Breitbart News after the death of founder Andrew Breitbart. The site has taken a rabidly anti-immigrant tone, often hyping “reports about crime involving immigrants, with headlines that sound like they came from tabloids” and attacking Republicans who favor immigration reform. Vox notes that “Breitbart essentially functioned as an anti-immigration pressure group, signaling to Republican leaders that any deviation on immigration would earn them the wrath of the base.”

    The site has also pushed a white nationalist viewpoint in articles on race and religion. It described the shooting of a white reporter and her white cameraman as a “race murder” and published an article titled “Political Correctness Protects Muslim Rape Culture.”

    Bannon wrote a column on the site accusing the “left” of engaging in a “plot to take down America” by focusing on police shootings of African-Americans. Breitbart also attacked Pope Francis for supporting refugee migration by invoking Camp of the Saints, a book described by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) as a novel that “depicts an invasion of France and the white Western world by a fleet of starving, dark-skinned refugees, characterized as horrific and uncivilized ‘monsters’ who will stop at nothing to greedily and violently seize what rightfully belongs to the white man.” SPLC notes that the novel is “a popular book in Alt-Right circles.”

    Milo Yiannopoulos

    Breitbart editor Milo Yiannopoulos has made his mark as a stridently anti-feminist provocateur. He declared his birthday to be “World Patriarchy Day” and encouraged his followers to “cat-call at least five women” and to tell a woman, “This isn’t going to suck itself.” He attended a protest against sexual assault and held a sign that said, “'Rape culture' and Harry Potter. Both fantasy.”

    In a Breitbart piece on the "alt-right” he praised the movement for its “youthful energy and jarring, taboo-defying rhetoric that have boosted its membership and made it impossible to ignore.” He dismissed the movement’s racial undertones, writing, “the alt-right's young meme brigades shock older generations with outrageous caricatures, from the Jewish 'Shlomo Shekelburg' to 'Remove Kebab,' an internet in-joke about the Bosnian genocide.”

    Discussing Islam, Yiannopoulos said, “There is a structural problem with this religion that is preventing its followers from assimilating properly into Western culture. There is something profoundly antithetical to our values about this particular religion.”

    In July, Twitter permanently suspended Yiannopoulos’ account after he led a harassment campaign against actress Leslie Jones, who is African-American. As BuzzFeed reported, many of the tweets “decried Jones for being black and a woman.”

    American Renaissance

    American Renaissance is a white nationalist online magazine, published by Jared Taylor. The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports that Taylor “believes black people are genetically predisposed to lower IQs” than white peoples and that black peoples “are sexually promiscuous because of hyperactive sex drives.” Taylor has appeared on talk shows to attack the legacy of civil rights pioneer Martin Luther King Jr.

    Mark Potok of the Southern Poverty Law Center describes Taylor as “the guy who is providing the intellectual heft, in effect, to modern-day Klansmen.”

    Taylor described himself as a Trump supporter and told ABC News, “Sending home all illegals -- the huge majority of whom are nonwhites -- and putting even a temporary halt on Muslim immigration are in the interests of whites, whether Trump thinks in those terms or not.” Taylor also recorded a pro-Trump robocall for a white nationalist super PAC. 

    American Renaissance also hosts conferences that have featured speakers including Richard Spencer and that are attended by white supremacists like former Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard David Duke.

    VDare.com

    VDare.com is described by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) as “an anti-immigration hate website” with a white nationalist ideology. SPLC adds that the site “regularly publishes articles by prominent white nationalists, race scientists and anti-Semites.” The site was founded by Peter Brimelow, who argued that his contributors are “not white supremacists” but “aim to defend the interests of American whites.” He also is the president of the VDare Foundation, “a nonprofit that warns against the polluting of America by non-whites, Catholics, and Spanish-speaking immigrants.”

    SPLC has pointed out that “Brimelow spent much of 2009 pounding the white nationalists message that the Republican Party would do better to spend its time attracting white voters rather than by reaching out to minorities.”

    Jared Taylor has contributed to VDare.com, where he wrote, “Our rulers and elites welcome replacement by aliens, they vilify our ancestors and their own, they sacrifice our interests to those of favored minorities, and they treat the entire history of the West as if it were a global plague of rapine and exploitation. This is a disease that is killing us, and we must fight it head on.”

    VDare.com was featured at the Republican National Convention when a tweet from the outlet was put on screen in the arena during the roll call vote for Trump’s presidential nomination.

    The Daily Stormer

    The neo-Nazi website Daily Stormer, headed by Andrew Anglin, describes itself as “the world’s most visited alt-right web site.” The website regularly defends Adolf Hitler, attacks “kikes,” and has a section documenting the purported “Jewish Problem.”

    Anglin attacked a GQ reporter for a piece he deemed unfair to Melania Trump, telling his followers to “go ahead and send [the reporter] a tweet and let her know what you think of her dirty kike trickery.” She then received a barrage of anti-Semitic messages and death threats, which she described as “the most obscene, anti-Semitic stuff I have frankly ever seen directed at me in my life.”

    The Political Cesspool”

    “The Political Cesspool” is a white nationalist radio program hosted by James Edwards that wishes “to revive the White birthrate above replacement level fertility.” The show was given press credentials by Trump’s campaign for a Tennessee campaign rally and was given “all-access” credentials to the Republican National Convention, where the show interviewed a Trump adviser and Republican congressmen. Edwards also interviewed Trump’s son, Donald Trump, Jr., who  agreed with Edwards’ contention that the media is “the enforcer of political correctness.”

    The Right Stuff

    The Right Stuff is an anti-Semitic blog with an affiliated podcast called The Daily Shoah. The site is run by Mike Enoch, who has said the core principle of the “alt-right” is “ethno-nationalism, meaning that nations should be as ethnically and racially homogeneous as possible.”

    The site created a meme called the “parenthesis meme” in which Jewish names are surrounded by parentheses, often in order to target them for online abuse on social media: “(((name)))”

    According to the Right Stuff’s editors, this was done because “all Jewish surnames echo throughout history.” They add: “The inner parenthesis represent the Jews' subversion of the home [and] destruction of the family through mass-media degeneracy. The next [parenthesis] represents the destruction of the nation through mass immigration, and the outer [parenthesis] represents international Jewry and world Zionism."

    The Anti-Defamation League has added the symbol to its online database of hate symbols. According to CEO Jonathan Greenblatt, “The echo symbol is the online equivalent of tagging a building with anti-Semitic graffiti or taunting someone verbally.”

    Enoch said Breitbart “is the closest thing to sympathetic to our position that is out there in the mainstream.”

    Mike Cernovich

    Mike Cernovich is an “alt-right” activist who operates the website Danger & Play.

    The site publishes numerous articles, essays, and audio recordings that attack feminists, "SJWs," (social justice warriors) and disputes the validity of date rape claims. Some headlines from Danger & Play include "Matriarchy has Created a False Rape Culture" and "Feminists Don't Care About Rape."

    On his Twitter accounts, Cernovich has dismissed the possibility of date rape, writing, “the hotter the sex, the more closely it resembles rape,” “the only rape culture is Muslim rape culture,” and asking “why should I care when women are raped?”

    Cernovich has promoted the false rumor that Hillary Clinton is suffering from health problems and also promoted a long-debunked conspiracy theory that Clinton aide Huma Abedin is affiliated with Islamic radicals.

    Reactions To The “Alt-Right”

    Traditional Conservative Pushback And Support

    Traditional conservative outlets and figures have pushed back some on the “alt-right” movement.

    Conservative New York Times columnist Ross Douthat described the “alt-right” as “racist pro-Trump Twitter accounts and anti-P.C. provocateurs.” The Federalist wrote that it’s “a mix of old bigotries and new identity and victimhood politics adapted for the straight white male.” In National Review, David French wrote of the “alt-right”: “Many of them are unapologetically white-nationalists, hate interracial adoption and other ‘race-mixing’ practices, and think about the issue of immigration primarily, if not exclusively, in racial terms.”

    A contributor to Spencer’s Alternative Right site, Jason Richwine, co-authored an immigration report at the conservative Heritage Foundation, which later disavowed him when writings he had made mocking the IQs of Latinos surfaced. Breitbart has recently highlighted Richwine’s work, and Bannon praised him on his radio show.

    The alt-right has also found some support from mainstream conservative outlets. After conservative writer Ben Shapiro described the “alt-right” as a “national, populist movement that is shot through with white supremacism” and "anti-Semitism," Fox News correspondent Doug McKelway defended the movement by claiming it’s “much more” than that.

    Similarly, last year Rush Limbaugh told a caller who spoke about the “alt-right” movement in Europe, “There is a thriving youthful conservative emergence happening in this country. They may be borrowing from what’s going on in Europe.”

    Mainstreaming The “Alt-Right”

    The cumulative effect of the rising popularity of “alt-right” media on the right, along with Bannon’s position leading the Trump campaign, means that a movement that was recently on the fringe is becoming central to conservative politics.

    The Washington Post reports that Trump’s decision to hire Bannon was the latest sign for white nationalists that “their worldview was gaining popularity and that the old Republican Party was coming to an end.” The paper added  that Trump’s electoral “strategy now resembles the alt-right dream of maximizing the white vote — even as polling shows his standing with white voters falls short of Mitt Romney’s in 2012.”

  • Trump Adviser And GOP Congressmen Gave Pro-Trump Interviews To White Nationalist Radio Host At The RNC

    James Edwards Celebrates Going “Mainstream” By Appearing At RNC With “All-Access” Media Credentials

    ››› ››› ERIC HANANOKI

    Several members of Congress and a Trump campaign official gave pro-Trump interviews to white nationalist leader James Edwards and his “pro-white” radio show The Political Cesspool during the Republican National Convention. Edwards is a David Duke acolyte and he “has probably done more than any of his contemporaries on the American radical right to publicly promote neo-Nazis, Holocaust deniers, raging anti-Semites and other extremists," according to the Southern Poverty Law Center. Edwards pointed to his attendance at the convention as evidence that he and his radio program are going “mainstream.”

  • White Nationalist Show's Syndicator Threatens To Release Emails Proving Trump Camp Lied About Interview

    Syndicator: "The Trump Campaign Through Their Booking Agency ... Absolutely Invited James To Do The Interview"

    Blog ››› ››› ERIC HANANOKI

    The syndicator for a white nationalist radio program is threatening to release emails proving Donald Trump's campaign is lying about having "nothing to do with" Donald Trump Jr. fielding questions from a white nationalist during an interview.  

    James Edwards is the host of the Liberty News Radio-syndicated The Political Cesspool, which describes itself as representing "a philosophy that is pro-White" and states that it has supported "pro-Confederate" causes against "black malcontents." 

    The Trump campaign gave Edwards and his Political Cesspool radio program press credentials for its February 27 rally in Memphis, TN. Edwards then wrote on his website that an upcoming show "will feature a previously taped 20-minute interview with Donald Trump, Jr." 

    Edwards' credentials and interview claim set off a media controversy and forced the Trump campaign to run for cover. The Trump campaign initially claimed on March 2:

    "Donald Trump Jr. was not in attendance and although he served as a surrogate for his father on several radio programs over the past week, to his knowledge and that of the campaign, did not participate in an interview with this individual."

    However, during the morning of March 1, Trump Jr. appeared on Liberty Roundtable with host Sam Bushman, with Edwards appearing as a guest and questioner. Bushman is Edwards' syndicator and friend, and he guest-hosted The Political Cesspool on February 27 while Edwards reported from the rally.

    Following the interview with Trump Jr. on that March 1 program, Edwards said the connection came about because "a press agency that's scheduling interviews for" Trump Jr. and brother Eric Trump reached out to Edwards to schedule an interview. Because of availability problems, the Liberty Roundtable hosted the interview instead of The Political Cesspool.

    After it was revealed that Trump Jr. talked to Edwards, the Trump campaign professed complete ignorance of him:

    Trump Jr. said Wednesday that he was speaking to another radio host for a previously scheduled interview via telephone when, unbeknownst to him, Edwards chimed in with questions. "He was brought into the interview without my knowledge," the 38-year-old executive vice president for the Trump Organization said in an interview with Bloomberg Politics. "Had I known, I would have obviously never done an interview with him."

    Bushman is now claiming the Trump campaign is lying about their interactions and is threatening to release "emails" proving it.

    On his March 3 show, Bushman claimed that in his email reply to Trump's booking agency, he wrote "this is Sam Bushman, I own Liberty News Radio, that's the nationally syndicated radio network, James has a show on my network called The Political Cesspool, he went to your rally, was credentialed at your rally, you reached out to James with your email, and I'm responding back and saying that James can't do the interview because he has a weekend show, but I would love to do the interview."

    Bushman then added: "The Trump campaign reached out through their booking agency, though. Remember that fact. The Trump campaign reached out to James to do a radio interview via their booking agency."

    Bushman says he responded to the agency making clear they wanted to do the interview and cc'd Edwards.

    He continued, "I called James and said 'James, do you want to be on with us?' And the reason I did is because this all came through James. It was James' media credentials that they had approved. James was the one that attended the rally. They were the ones that reached out -- meaning the Trump campaign through their booking agency -- and absolutely invited James to do the interview." 

    Bushman claimed "people are kind of hinting" they don't want him to re-air the interview, and he said he would "drag out every email" about the interview if the Trump campaign doesn't stop the "lies":

    BUSHMAN: The interview was incredible; we talked about all kinds of good things. In fact, we're going to play the interview back so you can hear it. OK, people are kind of hinting they don't want us to play it back. I don't take directions very well from these thugs. I don't appreciate their lies and abuse and manipulation and game playing. OK, so I'm just going to tell you the story straight and if they want to debate it, we'll take that sucker on CNN and drag out every email and every little tidbit and tit-for-tat and this whole thing, because we will slaughter them, including the Trump campaign if they don't stop. Now don't get me wrong, I'm not taking on the Trump campaign. I'm just telling you that we're not going to tolerate lies and game playing.

    In a subsequent segment, Bushman said, "Trump Jr. is backing away big time, and he shouldn't be." He continued that "the bottom line, though, is the Trump campaign is now saying, 'Well, we never reached out to James Edwards.' Well that's true, ladies and gentlemen, factually, but it's intellectually dishonest. Factually, their booking agency reached out to James. And they're now trying to say, 'Well, that booking agency didn't really do what they were supposed to.' OK, well now we can debate that: They were on hire from the Trump campaign."

    "The idea that they had nothing to do with it and didn't reach out to James is a lie," said Bushman.

    "We can prove it, don't play games with me. We have the emails. We can prove it. And we've even sent the emails to the campaign headquarters and so they know the truth. But they don't want to tell the truth."

  • LISTEN: Donald Trump Jr. And Pro-Confederate White Nationalist Complain About "Political Correctness"

    White Nationalist Edwards Claims A Booking Agency Working For The Trump Campaign Directly Reached Out To Him

    Blog ››› ››› ERIC HANANOKI

    Donald Trump Jr. appeared on a radio show with white nationalist James Edwards and agreed with Edwards' belief that the media is "the enforcer of political correctness." Edwards later claimed that the interview happened because "a press agency that's scheduling interviews for" Trump Jr. reached out to him.

    Edwards is the host of the Memphis-based The Political Cesspool, which describes itself as representing "a philosophy that is pro-White ... We wish to revive the White birthrate above replacement level fertility and beyond to grow the percentage of Whites in the world relative to other races." The show also states it has rallied to support "pro-Confederate" causes against "black malcontents." 

    Edwards has claimed that Martin Luther King Jr.'s "dream is our nightmare," "interracial sex is white genocide," and "slavery is the greatest thing that ever happened to" African-Americans. The Anti-Defamation League has written that Edwards and his program give voice to "a variety of anti-Semites, white supremacists, Holocaust deniers, conspiracy theorists and anti-immigrant leaders." The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) wrote that "Edwards has probably done more than any of his contemporaries on the American radical right to publicly promote neo-Nazis, Holocaust deniers, raging anti-Semites and other extremists." 

    On March 1, Edwards wrote a post on The Political Cesspool website claiming that he "attended a Donald Trump rally in Memphis on Saturday night as a fully credentialed member of the media and enjoyed the unique experience of being able to air a live broadcast of The Political Cesspool Radio Program from inside the press pen while the event was in full swing." He also wrote, "Next Saturday's show [March 5] will feature a previously taped 20-minute interview with Donald Trump, Jr."

    Edwards' credentials and interview claim set off a media controversy and forced the Trump campaign to run for cover. After initially denying any interview took place, Trump Jr. argued that the campaign had "worked with an outside booking agency to line up 35 radio interviews for him" and that one of those interviews was with conservative host Sam Bushman, who brought in Edwards to ask some questions "unbeknownst" to Trump Jr. But Edwards claims the agency initially reached out to him about Trump Jr. appearing on Political Cesspool, but scheduling difficulties resulted in the interview happening on Bushman's show.

    Trump Jr. appeared on the March 1 edition of Liberty Roundtable with Sam Bushman, alongside Edwards, who appeared as a guest and questioner. (Bushman was the guest host for The Political Cesspool on February 27 when Edwards reported live from the Trump rally.)

    Edwards first asked Trump Jr. if he agreed that the media "has long since abandoned objective reporting and now sees itself as the enforcer of political correctness. Am I off base?" Trump Jr. replied: "No, not at all. I mean, it's amazing when I see some of the stuff that's there":

    EDWARDS: It seems to me that the establishment press has long since abandoned objective reporting and now sees itself as the enforcer of political correctness. Am I off base in drawing that conclusion, and why do you --

    TRUMP JR.: No, not at all. I mean, it's amazing when I see some of the stuff that's there. And I've been to these rallies, and I traveled around, and I go to the debates, and I'm actually there. It's so disingenuous at this point, but I think because of my father, maybe he's got a big soap box, and that's why he's able to do it, but the average American is finally getting it. They see it. Because I'll watch a speech for an hour and you'll see it, and I'm sure you can vouch for me on this one, he'll say something in minute number five, he'll say something minute 15, he'll say something in minute 45, and they blend the three things together as though it was one thought and they say, "He's such a terrible person. Look what he said." You know, it's so phony. But people are getting it now, and that's what's amazing because this isn't just a political campaign, it's a movement.

    Edwards later told Trump Jr. that "as soon as I get off the line today, I'm going to vote and I'm going to be voting for Trump, obviously." Trump Jr. closed by telling the show and its listeners to "go out and vote" for Trump. 

    Listen to the full interview here.

    In a segment following the Trump Jr. interview , Edwards and Bushman claimed it came about because a press agency booking interviews for the Trump sons directly contacted The Political Cesspool and Edwards.

    "Donald Trump gives James Edwards credentials and then virtually reaches out to us, James, you've got to give him incredible credit for that," Bushman begin.

    After detailing how he had been approved for press credentials for the Memphis rally, Edwards said that "a press agency that's scheduling interviews for" Trump Jr. and brother Eric Trump reached out directly to Edwards and The Political Cesspool to schedule an interview but he scheduled it on Liberty Roundtable instead because he didn't broadcast on the day of availability:

    EDWARDS: But then on Sunday morning we get an email from a third party, it doesn't come directly from Donald Trump Jr., of course, it comes from a press agency that's scheduling interviews for him, and it was addressed to me at my radio show address. And they just said would you be interested in having either Donald Trump Jr. or Eric Trump on your program, either on Monday or Tuesday. And of course with my show airing on a Saturday night, it would be difficult for me to get him on a Monday or Tuesday.

    But we've got friends in high places so I call Sam Bushman, I say, "Sam, I got this opportunity to have one of the scions on the program but they only have availability on Monday or Tuesday. You want to go in on this together?" And Sam agrees and he reaches out, responds to the email on my behalf, and on behalf of the network. And then, well you just heard the rest. And they got back very quickly.

    Edwards repeated his claim in a March 3 post, stating that "an independent booking agency sent an e-mail to jamesedwards@thepoliticalcesspool.org" and "asked if I would be interested in having Trump Jr. on my program."

  • Trump Campaign Runs For Cover Following Revelation They Credentialed White Nationalist Radio Show

    Blog ››› ››› MATT GERTZ

    Trump

    Donald Trump's presidential campaign is running for cover following the revelation that a white nationalist radio show received press credentials for a Trump rally and will feature an interview with Donald Trump, Jr. 

    On March 1, Media Matters and Little Green Footballs' Charles Johnson reported that James Edwards, host of the white nationalist radio program The Political Cesspool, had written in a blog post that he "attended a Donald Trump rally in Memphis on Saturday night as a fully credentialed member of the media" and that his upcoming show "will feature a previously taped 20-minute interview with Donald Trump, Jr." Edwards repeatedly praised Trump in his blog post, calling him "the first Republican nominee that I have ever voted for" and declaring him "the only candidate who gives us a chance at having a fighter who will put America first." 

    As Media Matters has documented, national civil rights groups have criticized the program for supporting anti-Semites, Holocaust deniers, and white supremacists like David Duke. The show openly states on its website that it's a "pro-White" program that wishes "to revive the White birthrate above replacement level fertility." Edwards has also claimed that Martin Luther King Jr.'s "dream is our nightmare," "interracial sex is white genocide," and "slavery is the greatest thing that ever happened to" African-Americans.

    After coming under heavy criticism, the Trump campaign has responded by furiously backpedaling, seeking to avoid the taint of their toxic white nationalist supporters as Trump tries to solidify his hold on the Republican nomination.

    Trump's campaign claimed in a March 2 statement that media credentials were provided "to everyone that requested access to the event on Saturday in Memphis," adding: "There were close to 200 reporters in attendance and we do not personally vet each individual. The campaign had no knowledge of his personal views and strongly condemns them."

    But Trump's campaign has frequently denied access to specific reporters and publications who have displeased them. In fact, according to The Wrap, the African-American publication The New Tri-State Defender was denied credentials for the Memphis event Edwards attended.

    Trump's son has also claimed that he "wouldn't have consented to an interview with a pro-slavery radio host had he known the host held those views," according to BloombergPolitics. He asserted that the interview "was not vetted" and was the result of him calling "35 different stations to tout his father's GOP presidential campaign, and one host asked him to speak with another host, who ended up being Edwards."

    Responding to the controversy, Edwards wrote on his blog, "in no way should anyone interpret our press credentialing and subsequent interview with Donald Trump, Jr. as any kind of endorsement by the Trump campaign."

    Trump's campaign has repeatedly been the subject of heavy criticism and struggled to provide explanations for the support and praise they have received from white nationalist groups and figures. White nationalists have praised Trump for spurring "unprecedented interest in" their ideology and putting their ideas "firmly in the mainstream." Trump was recently excoriated after he repeatedly refused to denounce former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard David Duke's support during a February 28 CNN interview.

  • Donald Trump's Campaign Gave Press Credentials To A White Nationalist Radio Program

    ››› ››› ERIC HANANOKI

    Donald Trump's presidential campaign gave press credentials to the white nationalist radio program The Political Cesspoolwhich says it will soon air an interview with Donald Trump Jr. National civil rights groups have criticized the program for supporting anti-Semites, Holocaust deniers, and white supremacists like David Duke. The show openly states on its website that it's a "pro-White" program that wishes "to revive the White birthrate above replacement level fertility." It is hosted by white nationalist James Edwards, who has claimed that Martin Luther King Jr.'s "dream is our nightmare," "interracial sex is white genocide," and "slavery is the greatest thing that ever happened to" African-Americans.

  • INFOGRAPHIC: The Conservative Civil War Over Donald Trump

    Blog ››› ››› MEDIA MATTERS STAFF

    Conservative pundits are bickering over Donald Trump's campaign, especially after National Review's "Against Trump" issue and the backlash it engendered. On one side are pundits who want to stop Trump's candidacy in its tracks. On the other are conservatives who are lauding Trump's candidacy, even if they have not officially endorsed him. Media Matters breaks down exactly who is on which side (click for the full-sized image):

    Civil War over Donald Trump

    Graphic by Sarah Wasko, Research by Eric Hananoki
     
  • "The Guy Scares Me": Holocaust Survivors Warn About The Danger Of Trump's Right-Wing Media Approved Rhetoric

    Trump's Candidacy And Plans Have Been Hailed By Right-Wing And White Nationalist Media Figures

    ››› ››› LIS POWER

    On International Holocaust Remembrance Day, Holocaust survivors warned about the demagoguery and rhetoric espoused by Donald Trump that they say echoes back to Nazi Germany -- the same rhetoric which has been sanctioned by right-wing media and praised by white nationalist media as "wonderful."

  • White Nationalists Behind Pro-Trump Robocall: Trump's Response Was "Wonderful" And Validating

    Blog ››› ››› ERIC HANANOKI

    Two white nationalists who robocalled voters in support of Donald Trump are praising his response to their campaign as "wonderful" and a validation of their efforts. While Trump said he disavowed their robocall, the white nationalists believe Trump did it "in the nicest possible way" and affirmed "they're right to be furious."

    The American National Super PAC, led by William Daniel Johnson, earlier this month issued a robocall asking Iowa voters to support Trump because of his anti-immigrant views. Johnson, who identified himself during the call as a "white nationalist," told TPM he ultimately wants "a white ethno-state, a country made up of only white people." White nationalist writer Jared Taylor also participated in the call. The Anti-Defamation League describes Taylor as someone who "advocates voluntary segregation" and "upholds racial homogeneity as the key to fostering peaceful coexistence."

    During a January 13 interview, Trump was asked by CNN's Erin Burnett if he denounces the robocall. Trump responded: "I would disavow it, but nothing in this country shocks me. People are angry. They're angry at what's going on" with regard to illegal immigration: 

    BURNETT: Mr. Trump, when you hear that, does that shock you? Do you denounce that?

    TRUMP: Nothing in this country shocks me. I would disavow it, but nothing in this country shocks me. People are angry. They're angry at what's going on. They're angry at the border. They're angry at the crime. They're angry at people coming in and shooting Kate in the back in California and San Francisco. They're angry when Jamiel Shaw shot in the face by an illegal immigrant. They're angry when the woman, the veteran, 65 years old is raped, sodomized, and killed by an illegal immigrant. And, they're very angry about it, and -- by the way, thousands of other cases like that. They're very angry about it. So, I would disavow that, but I will tell you people are extremely angry.

    BURNETT: People are extremely angry, but to be clear, when he says, "We need smart, well-educated white people to assimilate to our culture, vote Trump," you're saying you disavow that. You do denounce that?

    TRUMP: Well, you just heard me. I said it. How many times do you want me to say it?

    BURNETT: A third would be good.

    TRUMP: I said I disavow.

    During a January 16 interview on the "pro-White" radio show The Political Cesspool, Johnson and host James Edwards praised Trump's response as "wonderful" and "quite good." Johnson said he "couldn't have asked for a better approach from him":

    JOHNSON: Donald Trump's response when he was asked to address it was just a wonderful response. He disavowed us, but he explained why there is so much anger in America that I couldn't have asked for a better approach from him.

    EDWARDS: I was going to ask you about that. So, you know, of course I saw that. In a perfect world he would say, "You know what? These guys are right. What are you going to do about it?" But understandably there is still a political reality. I think fundamentally, as I say on this show time and time again, most middle American, middle class whites agree with us fundamentally on the issues. But he's operating in a different world than that -- I think it was certainly better than to be expected. And I thought too it was quite good, as you did Bill, so this was something that you can live with in terms of a response from the Trump campaign and of course from there it's over. You know, the news cycle is over, if he's asked about it again he's already gone on record, he is the Teflon Don. He's the Teflon candidate. This wasn't of course made to hurt him, I don't know how much it hurt or helped him. Ultimately I don't think it did much of either -- it might have marginally helped him. It certainly didn't hurt him. And so his response is something that you greet with a level of respect, am I right?

    JOHNSON: Oh yeah I do, I like it very much. And also the response that I got -- I put my own cell phone number out there. And I got, oh, a hundred calls regarding it. Most of the calls were hang-ups. They wanted to know if it was a real phone number. So they'd either hang up or say, "Oh I'm sorry, wrong number." But there were a majority of calls who were opposed to it but there were a minority of calls who approved of it, and liked it. So that was encouraging also. And that is a new phenomenon. Before we would have gotten no one who would be willing to come out and say that so these little things incrementally help raise awareness of the issues and help change public opinion.

    Later in the program, Jared Taylor praised Trump for essentially saying he understands "exactly what these guys are saying, they're furious, and they're right to be furious." Taylor concluded that "if he disavowed us, he did it, I thought, in the nicest possible way." From his interview on The Political Cesspool:

    EDWARDS: Your reaction to the Donald Trump acknowledgement, I think better than anyone really could have expected, correct?

    TAYLOR: Yes, he was, you know, for days everybody was calling him up, calling up his campaign saying, "What do you think of these horrible people? Denounce them, denounce them." And he didn't. You know, he just maintained a dignified silence as he's capable of doing. And then finally when CNN's Erin Burnett really forced him to say, "Well, I would disavow it." But she asked him, "are you shocked by this? Will you denounce this?" "I'm not shocked by anything in America." I thought that was a great line. He's so quick on his feet. And then he goes to say, "I would disavow it" but then he goes on to explain why people are so angry. In effect, he's saying, "Yeah, yeah, if you want me to denounce it I will, but I understand exactly what these guys are saying, they're furious, and they're right to be furious." So if he disavowed us, he did it, I thought, in the nicest possible way.

    As Media Matters and other outlets have documented, Trump's far-right rhetoric has spurred an "unprecedented interest in" white nationalism and has put their ideas "firmly in the mainstream."

  • Radio Host Fired For Racist Tirade Resurfaces In "Pro-White" Media

    Anthony Cumia Agrees With White Nationalist Host That Black Community Has "Become Like A Petulant Child"

    Blog ››› ››› ERIC HANANOKI

    Radio host Anthony Cumia, who was fired from SiriusXM after a series of racially charged tweets, appeared on the "pro-White" Political Cesspool radio show hosted by white nationalist James Edwards. During the appearance, Cumia defended white males against diversity concerns, agreed that the black community has become like a "petulant" child, and praised Edwards for his views on race.

    Cumia was part of SiriusXM's The Opie and Anthony Show until he was fired in early July after he went on a Twitter tirade against the black community following a street altercation. The shock jock claimed he was "taking pix in NYC & a black girl who was in frame punched me in the face." He added the "automatic jump to violence in that community is astounding. No discussion. It's start punching at the least little thing. Uncivilized!!" SiriusXM fired Cumia "after careful consideration of his racially charged and hate-filled remarks."

    Cumia was then a guest on the August 2 broadcast of the Memphis-based The Political Cesspool, which describes itself as representing "a philosophy that is pro-White ... We wish to revive the White birthrate above replacement level fertility and beyond to grow the percentage of Whites in the world relative to other races." The show also states it has rallied to support "pro-Confederate" causes against "black malcontents." 

    Edwards wrote that he had Cumia on The Political Cesspool to discuss "the next phase of his career and his plan to talk openly and honestly about racial issues. This is what a REAL conversation about race sounds like." During the hour-long interview, Cumia complained about how white males are treated as "the abomination of the United States" despite their "astounding" historical achievements. He continued, citing the NASA Apollo program: 

    CUMIA: When you watch any of the footage of any of the Apollo programs over the years and you look at the control room of mission control, what do you see? Do you see diversity there? Honestly, let's be honest. You're seeing white males smoking cigarettes, drinking coffee at the console and putting people on the moon. How is this a horrible thing? How is this something to look at and say, "We need to change this by injecting people that do not pay attention to the laws of this country, do not assimilate to the cultures, do not work and contribute to this nation"? Why is this a good thing to then add these people into the formula to make this a great country? Diversity for the sense of just diversity is not a good thing. And when I talk about race and try to be open and honest about it in this day and age, you're chastised, you're looked at as the racist. 

  • News Corp. Columnist Holding Press Conference On "Why The GOP Must Win White America For Victory In 2012"

    Blog ››› ››› OLIVER WILLIS

    BrimelowPeter Brimelow, a columnist for News Corp.'s MarketWatch, has been announced as one of three speakers at a press conference discussing "Why the GOP Must Win White America for Victory in 2012."

    The press release explains:

    On September 9, The National Policy Institute will present a comprehensive, yet simple, strategy for a Republican victory in 2012--Win the White vote. "The Majority Strategy" is based on the GOP expanding its traditional White voting base, as opposed to continuing its failed "outreach" programs to racial minorities.

    Peter Brimelow of VDARE.com, radio host James Edwards, Jared Taylor of American Renaissance, and NPI's Richard Spencer will speak.

    The conference will take place from 1:30 to 3 PM in The National Press Club's Holeman Lounge.

    NPI will also release two detailed reports, the first of which summarizes the Majority Strategy and is available online for download.

    The event is being presented by the National Policy Institute (NPI), which describes itself as "promot[ing] the American majority's unique historical, cultural, and biological inheritance--and advances policies that, without prejudicing the legitimate rights of others, fearlessly defends our rights... our heritage."

  • Jerome Corsi's Where's The Birth Certificate? [Warning: MAJOR SPOILERS]

    Blog ››› ››› SIMON MALOY & BEN DIMIERO

    Yesterday marked the release of WorldNetDaily writer Jerome Corsi's latest book, Where's the Birth Certificate? A few short weeks ago, the book rode a wave of publicity from unscrupulous conservative websites like the Drudge Report and Fox Nation to #1 on the Amazon bestseller list. Led by Fox News, right-wing media outlets were embracing the birther canard at an ever-increasing pace.

    Then it all fell apart.

    In the intervening weeks, the birther "issue" has very publicly - and quite embarrassingly for prominent birthers like Corsi and former pretend presidential candidate Donald Trump - collapsed. Obama released his long-form birth certificate on April 27, demolishing the supposed impetus for Corsi's book and rendering it an amusing cultural artifact. In its published form, the book provides a glimpse into the fevered imaginations of some of the most prominent conspiracy theorists of the Obama era.

    Corsi announces in his preface that he was writing the book "in the conviction that Obama has usurped the office of the presidency by waging a skillful public relations campaign to suppress his actual birth circumstances." Unfortunately for Corsi, that "conviction" turned out to be utterly, laughably false.

    So, first things first: Where's The Birth Certificate?, Corsi asks in his book title. In the Foreword, WND CEO Joseph Farah repeats the question, saying that it has "dogged Obama throughout his term of office" and "may well cost him any chance for re-election in 2012."

    Well, here it is:

    Moving on...