Jared Taylor

Tags ››› Jared Taylor
  • VIDEO: Inside The “Alt-Right’s” White Nationalist, Pro-Trump Press Conference

    “We Have Not Been Made By Trump, But We Want To Make Trump”


    On September 9, three of the country’s most notorious white nationalists held a press conference in Washington, D.C., titled “What Is The Alt-Right?” The event, organized by the white nationalist “think tank” the National Policy Institute (NPI), came in response to growing media interest in the “alt-right” movement. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has helped mainstream the racist movement, including by hiring Breitbart News executive chairman Stephen Bannon as his campaign CEO. As the Southern Poverty Law Center has noted, under Bannon’s leadership, Breitbart has “has been openly promoting the core issues of the Alt-Right, introducing these racist ideas to its readership.”

    The press conference, which mixed plainly racist propaganda with praise for Trump’s campaign, highlights the “alt-right’s” desire to become a mainstream, professional, and legitimate part of American politics. Trump’s extreme position on immigration and other issues has propelled members of the “alt-right” into the spotlight, giving them unprecedented access to news networks and national audiences.

    But while the speakers at the conference acknowledged that the movement had been “riding [Trump’s] coattails,” they also made clear that they weren’t interested in being a “Trump cheerleading squad.” For them, this election is an opportunity to make the case for a pro-white political agenda that goes far beyond 2016. “The ideas of the alt-right are gaining ground rapidly, Trump or no Trump,” said one speaker. “We are gaining ground because we are right.”

  • White Nationalists See Trump As A Chance To Break Into The Media Mainstream

    Hours Before Clinton Highlighted Trump’s Racist Supporters, Three “Alt-Right” Leaders Gathered To Salute The GOP Nominee

    Blog ››› ››› CARLOS MAZA

    Prominent white nationalists touted their growing media influence in the wake of Donald Trump’s rise to the Republican presidential nomination on a wave of bigoted rhetoric at a September 9 press conference titled “What Is The Alt-Right?

    The press conference, organized by white nationalist “think tank” the National Policy Institute (NPI), aimed to explain how the “alt-right” -- a movement of fringe modern white supremacists -- had “become a force in American politics in such a short period of time.” The racist movement has garnered renewed interest from media outlets in the wake of Hillary Clinton’s August 25 speech decrying the Trump campaign’s cozy relationship with the movement, including the hiring of Breitbart News executive chairman and alt-right leader Stephen Bannon as campaign CEO.

    The press conference featured three prominent white nationalist speakers: NPI president Richard Spencer, who coined the term “alt-right;” Jared Taylor, who publishes the white nationalist online magazine American Renaissance; and Peter Brimelow, who founded the white nationalist anti-immigration site VDare.com.

    The press conference came just hours before Clinton told supporters at a fundraiser that half of Trump’s supporters belonged to a “basket of deplorables” -- people who harbor "racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamaphobic” animus who have been “lifted … up” by the Republican nominee. Indeed, the white nationalist movement has provided Trump with some of his most fervent supporters and praised him for helping to grow their ranks.

    Spencer began the press conference by noting the “alt-right’s” unprecedented media moment. The movement, which has for years been relegated to the extreme racist fringes of the internet, has broken into the American public’s consciousness, thanks in large part to the “alt-right’s” vocal support of Trump’s anti-immigration platform. “We’re not just some marginal movement that you could dismiss,” Spencer told the room of supporters and journalists. “The fact is our ideas are so powerful that despite the fact that we’re doing all this on a shoe-string, we’re getting at people. We’re affecting them. They know we’re right.”

    Indeed, the Trump campaign has helped bring the racist "alt-right" movement into the mainstream -- rubbing elbows with white nationalists, echoing many of their common themes, and demonizing Muslims and immigrants.

    That willingness to flirt with the racist fringe is what has captured the imagination of people like Spencer, who see in Trump a "leader" who is willing to shirk norms when talking about race and identity. “He seems to be willing to go there, he seems to be willing to confront people.  And that is very different from the cuckold.”

    Spencer described Trump’s campaign as a kind of jumping-off point for the “alt-right” -- an opportunity to introduce their pro-white agenda to a broad national audience. “Certainly we have been, you could say, riding his coattails, there’s been more interest in us because we’re generally pro-Trump, because we’re inspired by him and things like that.”

    The press conference also featured a significant amount of the explicitly racist rhetoric that one would expect from white nationalists -- Taylor argued that blacks and Latinos are genetically predisposed to have lower IQs and behave less ethically than whites, Spencer waxed poetic about the importance of protecting a white cultural identity in America, and all three speakers expressed concern about the influence of Jewish people in American politics.

    But beyond that, the press conference pointed to the speakers’ emerging awareness of the need to transform the “alt-right” from a disorganized and anonymous movement of internet trolls and meme-creators into a serious, professional political movement.

    “I think the big challenge for the alt-right is a professionalization,” Spencer told his audience. “We’ve got to have professional organizations, professional people doing it… We want to increase our exposure, increase our influence.”

    For the “alt-right” speakers in the room, being Trump supporters, while important, was secondary to their primary goal of advancing their pro-white agenda. Spencer acknowledged that Trump could not fairly be described as “alt-right,” instead describing Trump’s campaign as an opportunity to influence a major political party’s candidate to advance a pro-white agenda.

    “We have not been made by Trump but we want to make Trump,” Spencer declared, “and we want to imagine him in our image.”

  • White Nationalist Media Cheers Trump’s “Almost Perfect” Immigration Speech

    Blog ››› ››› MATT GERTZ

    Donald Trump’s August 31 immigration speech was an angry, hateful rant that sought to fearmonger over the purported dangers immigrants pose to the United States. Trump’s white nationalist media supporters loved it.

    Trump’s disturbing courtship with and widespread support from white nationalists is unprecedented for a major party nominee in recent history. Stephen Bannon, the chief executive of the "alt-right" publication Breitbart News, recently became chief executive of Trump's campaign.

    During and after Trump’s speech, white nationalists weighed in with glowing testimonials.

    Jared Taylor, publisher of the white nationalist publication American Renaissance:

    David Duke, radio host and former Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan:

    Richard Spencer, white nationalist writer and founder of the “alt-right”:

    Creative Commons image via Gage Skidmore

  • INFOGRAPHIC: The Conservative Civil War Over Donald Trump

    Blog ››› ››› MEDIA MATTERS STAFF

    Conservative pundits are bickering over Donald Trump's campaign, especially after National Review's "Against Trump" issue and the backlash it engendered. On one side are pundits who want to stop Trump's candidacy in its tracks. On the other are conservatives who are lauding Trump's candidacy, even if they have not officially endorsed him. Media Matters breaks down exactly who is on which side (click for the full-sized image):

    Civil War over Donald Trump

    Graphic by Sarah Wasko, Research by Eric Hananoki
  • White Nationalists Behind Pro-Trump Robocall: Trump's Response Was "Wonderful" And Validating

    Blog ››› ››› ERIC HANANOKI

    Two white nationalists who robocalled voters in support of Donald Trump are praising his response to their campaign as "wonderful" and a validation of their efforts. While Trump said he disavowed their robocall, the white nationalists believe Trump did it "in the nicest possible way" and affirmed "they're right to be furious."

    The American National Super PAC, led by William Daniel Johnson, earlier this month issued a robocall asking Iowa voters to support Trump because of his anti-immigrant views. Johnson, who identified himself during the call as a "white nationalist," told TPM he ultimately wants "a white ethno-state, a country made up of only white people." White nationalist writer Jared Taylor also participated in the call. The Anti-Defamation League describes Taylor as someone who "advocates voluntary segregation" and "upholds racial homogeneity as the key to fostering peaceful coexistence."

    During a January 13 interview, Trump was asked by CNN's Erin Burnett if he denounces the robocall. Trump responded: "I would disavow it, but nothing in this country shocks me. People are angry. They're angry at what's going on" with regard to illegal immigration: 

    BURNETT: Mr. Trump, when you hear that, does that shock you? Do you denounce that?

    TRUMP: Nothing in this country shocks me. I would disavow it, but nothing in this country shocks me. People are angry. They're angry at what's going on. They're angry at the border. They're angry at the crime. They're angry at people coming in and shooting Kate in the back in California and San Francisco. They're angry when Jamiel Shaw shot in the face by an illegal immigrant. They're angry when the woman, the veteran, 65 years old is raped, sodomized, and killed by an illegal immigrant. And, they're very angry about it, and -- by the way, thousands of other cases like that. They're very angry about it. So, I would disavow that, but I will tell you people are extremely angry.

    BURNETT: People are extremely angry, but to be clear, when he says, "We need smart, well-educated white people to assimilate to our culture, vote Trump," you're saying you disavow that. You do denounce that?

    TRUMP: Well, you just heard me. I said it. How many times do you want me to say it?

    BURNETT: A third would be good.

    TRUMP: I said I disavow.

    During a January 16 interview on the "pro-White" radio show The Political Cesspool, Johnson and host James Edwards praised Trump's response as "wonderful" and "quite good." Johnson said he "couldn't have asked for a better approach from him":

    JOHNSON: Donald Trump's response when he was asked to address it was just a wonderful response. He disavowed us, but he explained why there is so much anger in America that I couldn't have asked for a better approach from him.

    EDWARDS: I was going to ask you about that. So, you know, of course I saw that. In a perfect world he would say, "You know what? These guys are right. What are you going to do about it?" But understandably there is still a political reality. I think fundamentally, as I say on this show time and time again, most middle American, middle class whites agree with us fundamentally on the issues. But he's operating in a different world than that -- I think it was certainly better than to be expected. And I thought too it was quite good, as you did Bill, so this was something that you can live with in terms of a response from the Trump campaign and of course from there it's over. You know, the news cycle is over, if he's asked about it again he's already gone on record, he is the Teflon Don. He's the Teflon candidate. This wasn't of course made to hurt him, I don't know how much it hurt or helped him. Ultimately I don't think it did much of either -- it might have marginally helped him. It certainly didn't hurt him. And so his response is something that you greet with a level of respect, am I right?

    JOHNSON: Oh yeah I do, I like it very much. And also the response that I got -- I put my own cell phone number out there. And I got, oh, a hundred calls regarding it. Most of the calls were hang-ups. They wanted to know if it was a real phone number. So they'd either hang up or say, "Oh I'm sorry, wrong number." But there were a majority of calls who were opposed to it but there were a minority of calls who approved of it, and liked it. So that was encouraging also. And that is a new phenomenon. Before we would have gotten no one who would be willing to come out and say that so these little things incrementally help raise awareness of the issues and help change public opinion.

    Later in the program, Jared Taylor praised Trump for essentially saying he understands "exactly what these guys are saying, they're furious, and they're right to be furious." Taylor concluded that "if he disavowed us, he did it, I thought, in the nicest possible way." From his interview on The Political Cesspool:

    EDWARDS: Your reaction to the Donald Trump acknowledgement, I think better than anyone really could have expected, correct?

    TAYLOR: Yes, he was, you know, for days everybody was calling him up, calling up his campaign saying, "What do you think of these horrible people? Denounce them, denounce them." And he didn't. You know, he just maintained a dignified silence as he's capable of doing. And then finally when CNN's Erin Burnett really forced him to say, "Well, I would disavow it." But she asked him, "are you shocked by this? Will you denounce this?" "I'm not shocked by anything in America." I thought that was a great line. He's so quick on his feet. And then he goes to say, "I would disavow it" but then he goes on to explain why people are so angry. In effect, he's saying, "Yeah, yeah, if you want me to denounce it I will, but I understand exactly what these guys are saying, they're furious, and they're right to be furious." So if he disavowed us, he did it, I thought, in the nicest possible way.

    As Media Matters and other outlets have documented, Trump's far-right rhetoric has spurred an "unprecedented interest in" white nationalism and has put their ideas "firmly in the mainstream."

  • Donald Trump Is A Fundraising Engine For White Nationalist Media

    Blog ››› ››› ERIC HANANOKI

    Two leading white nationalist media websites have used Donald Trump in their recent fundraising drives. The solicitations hail Trump for spurring "unprecedented interest in" white nationalism and putting their ideas "firmly in the mainstream."

    White nationalists have been backing Trump's presidential campaign, especially his extreme positions on Hispanic and Muslim immigration. And the emergence of Trump has helped bolster white nationalist groups' finances and political organizing. 

    White nationalist William Daniel Johnson, who wants "a country made up of only white people," recently founded the American National Super PAC and is robocalling Republican primary voters in support of Trump. Politico wrote in December that "The Ku Klux Klan is using Donald Trump as a talking point in its outreach efforts. Stormfront, the most prominent American white supremacist website, is upgrading its servers in part to cope with a Trump traffic spike. And former Louisiana Rep. David Duke reports that the businessman has given more Americans cover to speak out loud about white nationalism than at any time since his own political campaigns in the 1990s."

    Recent fundraising appeals for the white nationalist websites VDARE.com and American Renaissance illustrate how Trump has become part of the far-right's fundraising strategy.

    The anti-immigrant website VDARE.com "regularly publishes works by white supremacists, anti-Semites, and others on the radical right," according to the Southern Poverty Law Center. 

    A December 8 post cited Trump's call for a ban on Muslim immigration and concluded "[b]ecause of the improbable rise of Donald Trump ... our ideas are now firmly in the mainstream." VDARE added that Americans are ready for a "rebellion against Open Borders and the tyranny of political correctness" but (emphasis in original) "THIS WILL NOT HAPPEN UNLESS YOU SUPPORT US. I hate to be blunt, but money talks. So many people ask what they can do. And the fact is, the most important thing you can do is put your money to a cause you believe in."

    A December 14 appeal from founder Peter Brimelow contained a picture of his wife, Lydia, attending a Trump rally and hailed the Republican candidate for running "on the patriotic immigration reform issue." He wrote that VDARE has "defended Trump on Hispanic rapists (they are a problem), black-on-white crime (he's right), ending Muslim immigration (it's legal), ending birthright citizenship (it's legal too), etc. etc." The appeal added "we can only do this with your help" and solicited donations for the website. 

    On January 1, Lydia Brimelow wrote that VDARE's "goal was $100,000, more than twice what we've brought in during a single appeal in the past. Not only did we meet our goal-WE SURPASSED IT! As of this writing we have a total of $105,047, and I haven't picked up the mail since 12/30." She added that "as evidenced by this incredible response, VDARE.com, the voice of the historic American nation, is getting louder and louder!"

    American Renaissance is a white nationalist publication that regularly features "proponents of eugenics and blatant anti-black racists," according to the SPLC. It is produced by the New Century Foundation, which "promotes pseudo-scientific studies and research that purport to show the inferiority of blacks to whites" and sponsors "conferences every other year where racist 'intellectuals' rub shoulders with Klansmen, neo-Nazis and other white supremacists." White nationalist Jared Taylor is the editor of American Renaissance and president of New Century Foundation.

    Taylor wrote a December 21 fundraising email stating that "Trump and the flood of migrants into Europe have resulted in unprecedented interest in American Renaissance" and "we need your help" with donations:

    Something has changed.

    The rise Donald Trump and the flood of migrants into Europe have resulted in unprecedented interest in American Renaissance.

    Never before have our online videos been so popular, or shared so widely.

    The last time I wrote to you, our videos had been viewed 342,000 times over the previous year. I thought that was promising, but in just the last six months, they've been watched another 640,000 times--nearly quadruple the previous rate!

    One of our videos on Donald Trump has had over 87,000 views. Our video on the "refugee" invasion of Europe has had 230,000 views--and the numbers keep rising.

    I used to be excited when a video got 25,000 views in a year.

    Thanks to these videos, more and more white Americans--especially young people--are learning about American Renaissance and what we represent.


    We must make the most of this sea-change. We must break the stranglehold of the liberal, anti-white media.

    No matter what you can give--$25, $50, $100, $500, or even $1,000 or $5,000, please do so.

    Taylor is part of the American National Super PAC's robocall. He states that Trump "is the one candidate who points out that we should accept immigrants who are good for America. We don't need Muslims. We need smart, well-educated white people who will assimilate to our culture. Vote Trump." 

  • The Supremacy Cause: Inside The White Nationalist Movement

    Blog ››› ››› BRIAN POWELL

    National Policy Institute

    "The Free Market Won't Let Us Speak"

    Richard Spencer, executive director of the National Policy Institute (NPI), was beginning his opening remarks as I settled uneasily into my seat in the back row of a small, brightly lit banquet room. From a podium at the front of the room, the brown-haired young man pointed to a projection of a color-shaded world map that he claimed depicted regional variations in the average Intelligence Quotient (IQ) of indigenous populations.

    According to the map, East Asian and European peoples possess the highest IQs while African and Australian indigenous populations possess the lowest. He then switched to a NASA photograph of the world at night, depicting city lights around the globe visible from space. He compared the brightest-lit areas (China, Europe, North America) to the previous map, proclaiming that the brightest localities were also those with the highest IQ.

    "You can see, Africa is literally the Dark Continent."

    It was on that note that NPI's national conference, titled Towards a New Nationalism: Immigration and the Future of Western Nations, began. This was the first such event for the fledgling white nationalist organization NPI, a think tank of sorts dedicated to "promot[ing] the American majority's unique historical, cultural, and biological inheritance - and advances policies that, without prejudicing the legitimate rights of others, fearlessly defends our rights...our heritage." Dedicated, in other words, to advancing the interests of the white race.

    The event was a first for me as well. I would be, for the first time, experiencing a gathering of white supremacists from such an intimate perspective. Watching, learning, interacting -- I would attempt to sort out what they believe and why and explore the relationship between the white nationalist movement and the more mainstream political spectrum. As a clean-cut white male, my presence wasn't suspicious and the other attendees assumed I shared their views. For my part, I let them assume, and I did my best to blend in.

    I had no idea what to expect when I arrived at 9 a.m., but a part of me anticipated swarms of protestors, a strong police presence clashing with private security forces and a raucous racist crowd inside the hall, cheering on some podium-smacking orator bloviating about the evils of the Jewish race and the need to oppress the black community.

    Instead, I was greeted jovially upon arrival to a scene that more closely resembled a modest cocktail party, with no security and a few people standing around sipping coffee and discussing literature. I picked up my name tag and glanced at the design -- a photograph of a white family smiling over a white background adjacent to the well-known political cartoon by Benjamin Franklin depicting a severed serpent and the phrase "JOIN, or DIE."

    Reading over the conference program, I caught a glimpse of what I was in for from the titles of the speeches to come. They ranged from the blandly predictable - "Is Arizona the Answer?", "Prospects for a Nationalist Right in America"; to the ominously enigmatic - "Apocalypse Now," "Totalitarian Humanism and Mass Immigration," "The Masters of the Universe"; to the truly chill-inducing -- "The Idea and Ideal of the Ethno-State."