Beck: different races "afraid to hang out with each other ... because we're afraid ... somebody's gonna sic the NAACP on us"

Video ››› ››› MATT SINGER

On his radio show, Glenn Beck claimed that one reason different races are "afraid to hang out with each other" is that "we're afraid ... somebody's gonna sic the NAACP on us." Beck also urged people to "drop the Ebonics crap" because, he said, "[t]here's times that I've gotten into conversation with people, and I don't know what they're saying to me ... and I don't wanna say, 'What the hell are you even talking about?' ... Let's speak the same language." He also stated that "what I say is not racist."

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On the July 21 edition of his nationally syndicated radio show, CNN host Glenn Beck claimed that one reason different races are "afraid to hang out with each other" is that "we're afraid ... somebody's gonna sic the NAACP [National Association for the Advancement of Colored People] on us, or somebody's gonna sic an attorney on us." Beck added that "African-Americans are just ... as uncomfortable speaking in a room full of white people as I am speaking in a room full of black people." He concluded by stating that "what I say is not racist," but conceded that "I don't know what would be perceived as racist."

Later in the segment, Beck urged people to "drop the Ebonics crap" and recommended they "speak the same language" instead.

From the July 21 edition of Premiere Radio Networks' The Glenn Beck Program:

BECK: Now, I understand that we are uncomfortable with each other. That is -- that is a part of life. You are right there that, you know, white people generally hang out with white people. Black people generally hang out with black people, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera -- all down the line, because we have -- we have our cultures in common. We have our histories in common in many ways, but, see, that's the problem. That's why we used to've concentrate on being a melting pot.

And the other reason why we're afraid to hang out with each other is because we're afraid that, you know, somebody's gonna sic the NAACP on us, or somebody's gonna sic an attorney on us. We -- we're both -- I contend that African-Americans are just on -- as uncomfortable speaking in a room full of white people as I am speaking in a room full of black people, because I'm constantly -- I have a constant inner dialogue in my head -- not of "don't say anything racist," but "don't say anything that might be perceived by others as racist." And here's why it freaks you out, and you just clam up and don't say anything, because I don't know what would be perceived as racist. Because what I say is not racist.

[...]

BECK: If we speak the same language, if we use the same -- if we use the same language -- and I mean that by not Spanish and English, although that's important -- I mean, drop the Ebonics crap. There's times that I've gotten into conversation with people, and I don't know what they're saying to me, because it's Ebonics, and I don't wanna say, "What the hell are you even talking about? What?" And it -- I don't wanna say anything because I just don't want -- that's the whitest white guy ever. Like that's a slam. Let's speak the same language. Let's believe in the American dream that you can accomplish anything with hard work, with education, with optimism. Let's start melting into each other again.

Posted In
Diversity & Discrimination, Race & Ethnicity
Network/Outlet
Premiere Radio Networks
Person
Glenn Beck
Show/Publication
Glenn Beck Program
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