Boortz, who's said congresswoman "looks like a ghetto slut," blasted "denigration of black women through rap music"

Video ››› ››› ADAM SERWER

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On the April 16 broadcast of his nationally syndicated radio show, Neal Boortz responded to a statement released by Media Matters for America President and CEO David Brock identifying Boortz as one of many sources of bigotry in the media by asking, "[T]hat George Soros-funded group Media Matters, who are they going to focus on next?" In fact, Media Matters has not received funding from progressive philanthropist George Soros.

Later in the broadcast, Boortz proclaimed that he would not allow Rev. Al Sharpton to be a guest on his show. Boortz declared, "[T]his is a man who refers to Greeks as 'homos.' This is a man that talks about white interlopers. This is a man that refers to Jews as 'diamond merchants.' I'm going to put him on my show?" He added, "[M]y show doesn't engage in that kind of name-calling." However, on the March 31, 2006, broadcast of his radio show, Boortz said that former Rep. Cynthia McKinney (D-GA) "looks like a ghetto slut," for which he later apologized.

While discussing steps he was taking because his "back was really hurting," Boortz stated, "Belinda [Skelton, producer] walked on my back. We looked around the station for a little Asian girl; couldn't find one. So I had to settle for Belinda. That really felt good by the way." Skelton responded, "OK. Love you long time." Boortz replied, "Happy ending. That really felt good." Skelton was repeating a line spoken by a Vietnamese prostitute portrayed in the 1987 film Full Metal Jacket.

Referring to syndicated television host Oprah Winfrey's April 16 broadcast of her program from Spelman College to discuss the aftermath of syndicated radio host Don Imus' firing for calling the Rutgers University women's basketball team "nappy-headed hos," Boortz speculated, "Will we finally end the denigration of black women through rap music? Personally, I think its jealousy. ... I mean, on the part of the rappers, because, you know, I mean, look at black women, black men. Who are the higher educated, who has -- you know, is there a higher percentage of black women in college or black men? Black women. Moving up the corporate ladder -- black women, black men? Black women."

Discussing Winfrey's show, Boortz referred to Sharpton and Rev. Jesse Jackson as "race warlords," stating, "Neither Jesse Jackson nor Al Sharpton will be a guest on her program today. They are not going to be a part of the show. ... And you know, ladies and gentlemen, you know they asked to be on the show. And Oprah told them, 'no'. So, glad Oprah had the sense to keep those race warlords away from her town hall meeting this afternoon." In fact, Sharpton was a guest on Winfrey's April 16 show, as the Chicago Sun-Times reported.

From the April 16 broadcast of Cox Radio Syndication's The Neal Boortz Show, with producer Belinda Skelton and Royal Marshall, engineer and "sidekick":

BOORTZ: I am watching anxiously to see who the media is going to concentrate on next. You know Al "the liar" Sharpton, Jesse "the sloganmaster" Jackson, and then that George Soros-funded group Media Matters, who are they going to focus on next?

[...]

BOORTZ: My back was really hurting after that golf on Saturday, Royal. I just -- I wasn't in shape to swing that club. I didn't do any stretching exercises or anything. So this morning I took three Advil, OK, and then as soon as I got to the station, Belinda the drug pusher, what did I take Belinda?

SKELTON: Two Fioricets.

BOORTZ: Fioricets.

SKELTON: You're a happy camper, aren't you?

BOORTZ: I got three Advil and two Fioricets in me.

SKELTON: And I walked on your back.

BOORTZ: And Belinda walked on my back. We looked around the station for a little Asian girl; couldn't find one. So I had to settle for Belinda. That really felt good by the way.

SKELTON: OK. Love you long time.

BOORTZ: Happy ending. That really felt good.

[...]

BOORTZ: I have congratulations for Oprah Winfrey today. Her show this afternoon is - it's going to take place from here, at Spelman College. Did you know that? Oprah Winfrey is bringing her show to Spelman College. And it's going to be a town hall meeting, and it's going to be on the Imus thing. The purpose is to discuss whether mainstream culture is going to change as a result of the Imus episode, including hip-hop, rap, this, that, and the other thing. Will we finally end the denigration of black women through rap music? Personally, I think it's jealousy. But anyway -- I mean on the part of the rappers, because, you know, I mean, look at black women, black men. Who are the higher educated, who has -- you know, is there a higher percentage of black women in college or black men? Black women. Moving up the corporate ladder -- black women, black men? Black women.

MARSHALL: So the rappers are jealous of --

BOORTZ: That's exactly right, so they call them hos and bitches.

MARSHALL: Uh yeah.

BOORTZ: That's it.

MARSHALL: Oh yeah that's it.

BOORTZ: I put a lot of thought into this, Royal.

MARSHALL: I can tell. You must have volumes of research.

BOORTZ: I do. In fact, I've been asked to testify before Congress on this. But Oprah, this is why I'm really proud of her. Neither Jesse Jackson nor Al Sharpton will be a guest on her program today. They are not going to be a part of the show. Jason Whitlock, the Kansas City sports columnist that wrote that column I read to you last week, he will be a part of the show. Al Sharpton, no. Jesse Jackson, no. And you know, ladies and gentlemen, you know that they asked to be on the show. And Oprah told them, "no." So, glad Oprah had the sense to keep those race warlords away from her town hall meeting this afternoon. So, kudos to Oprah, I hope kudos is, is it OK, kudos? I've never really looked up the meaning of that word. I could get nailed on that. Kudos to Oprah for her program this afternoon.

[...]

BOORTZ: But this is a man who refers to Greeks as "homos." This is a man that talks about white interlopers. This is a man that refers to Jews as "diamond merchants." I'm going to put him on my show?

CALLER: Well, that's a valid point.

BOORTZ: Yeah. I mean, my show doesn't engage in that kind of name-calling.

Posted In
Diversity & Discrimination, Gender, Race & Ethnicity
Person
Neal Boortz
Show/Publication
The Neal Boortz Show
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