WSJ: Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Is A "Bureaucratic Rogue"

Blog ››› ››› MEDIA MATTERS STAFF

In a March 16 editorial, The Wall Street Journal attacked the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau -- created as part of financial reform legislation in 2010 -- calling it a "bureaucratic rogue" and stating, "We'd like to see Congress kill the agency entirely."

From the editorial:

A House subcommittee will hold an "oversight" hearing today on the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the über-regulator that will soon have jurisdiction over most of the country's credit-making institutions. We put "oversight" in quotes because Congress has little say over either the new bureau or its unofficial czar, Elizabeth Warren.

This unprecedented lack of accountability is by Ms. Warren's design. The bureau was the Harvard professor's idea, and she lobbied the Obama Administration and Congress to make it part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform. That law calls it an "independent bureau," akin to an independent agency like the Securities and Exchange Commission. But that's deceptive. Unlike other agencies, it isn't subject to annual Congressional appropriations.

[...]

This is no way to run a government, especially not one that Madison envisioned. The consumer bureau is essentially a bureaucratic rogue. We'd like to see Congress kill the agency entirely. But at the very least Congress should remove it from the Fed, make it part of the Treasury and subject it to annual appropriations. No one elected--or even nominated--Elizabeth Warren.

Posted In
Economy
Network/Outlet
Wall Street Journal
Stories/Interests
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Dodd-Frank
We've changed our commenting system to Disqus.
Instructions for signing up and claiming your comment history are located here.
Updated rules for commenting are here.