Conservative Media Revolt Over Prospect Of Kevin McCarthy As House Majority Leader

Blog ››› ››› ERIC HANANOKI

McCarthy was elected House majority leader on June 19.  

Just days after Rep. Eric Cantor was ousted in a Republican primary, right-wing media are outraged at the ideological credentials of his likely replacement as House majority leader. Conservatives are calling Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) "dimwitted," "pro-amnesty," and "just another in a long line of big spenders who thinks the Democrats in charge of government are the problem, not government itself."

The Washington Post reported that McCarthy is the "overwhelming front-runner" to be the majority leader after he "appeared to have consolidated ranks in almost every corner of the House GOP caucus and seemed well positioned to win next week's snap election to succeed Rep. Eric Cantor." The Los Angeles Times similarly reported McCarthy "is all but assured of becoming the next House majority leader."  

Cantor has endorsed his "dear friend" McCarthy, stating: "He'd make an outstanding majority leader, and I will be backing him with my full support."

But the prospect of McCarthy replacing Cantor has drawn strong condemnation from conservative pundits, including radio hosts Mark Levin and Laura Ingraham, who campaigned against Cantor.

On his June 10 broadcast, radio host Mark Levin said Republicans need "a conservative in that slot, not that dimwitted McCarthy." On June 12, Levin said that McCarthy has positions that "are identical to Cantor's and Boehner's. He's a moderate Republican, he's pro-amnesty. He was the Republican whip. Do you know what the Republican whip means? It means whip them into line. Whip the votes into line. He not only went along with [House Speaker John] Boehner and Cantor on all these issues, but he was the enforcer." Levin also tweeted, "House GOP learned nothing from Cantor defeat; pushing disastrous McCarthy for majority leader."

Fox News contributor Laura Ingraham said on the June 11 edition of Fox & Friends that McCarthy is "kind of joined at the hip" with Cantor and Boehner on immigration reform. She added that if "they put Kevin McCarthy in there, I think they're creating more problems for themselves." On her radio show on June 12, Ingraham said McCarthy "is more out there on immigration reform, I think, coming from California too, than Eric Cantor was. So if you loved Eric Cantor, you're going to just -- you're going to have a man crush on Kevin McCarthy. That's going to work out really well for us."

Erick Erickson wrote a June 11 RedState post headlined, "Not McCarthy." The Fox News contributor wrote that "McCarthy is not very conservative and, for all of Cantor's faults, lacks Cantor's intelligence on a number of issues. Lest we forget, McCarthy had several high profile screw ups as Whip and has not really seemed to ever improve over time." In another post called "The Stupid Party," Erickson wrote that McCarthy "is just another in a long line of big spenders who thinks the Democrats in charge of government are the problem, not government itself."

The Washington Examiner's Philip Klein wrote that if "Republicans respond to the shocking primary defeat of Majority Leader Rep. Eric Cantor, R-Va., by elevating his handpicked successor Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., it would be beyond tone-deaf. It would be pure absurdity." Klein went on to complain that McCarthy "voted for a Hurricane Sandy relief bill that included spending that was unrelated to providing emergency aid, fought for the farm and food stamp bill, fought reforms to the federal sugar program, and backed an extension of the corporate welfare agency known as the Export-Import Bank."

Media Research Center vice president Dan Gainor tweeted that "GOP picking McCarthy shows DC elites are not serious about listening to grassroots. They need to lose more elections" and "#GOP desperate to lose base by backing McCarthy. #tonedeaf."

Conservative blogger Jim Hoft tweeted on June 11: "Death Knell: @EricCantor says he will support Kevin McCarthy for Majority Leader - No Thanks." 

Posted In
The House of Representatives
Laura Ingraham, Mark Levin
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