On Backbone Radio, former Hitler Youth member accused ACLU of "distributing Nazi philosophy"

››› ››› MEDIA MATTERS STAFF

In response to former Republican Colorado Senate president John Andrews' question "Who are the neo-Nazis around us today?" on the January 14 broadcast of his Backbone Radio show, former Hitler Youth member Hilmar von Campe replied, "I think the ACLU is distributing Nazi philosophy." Earlier in the broadcast, von Campe claimed, "I have read the Quran, and I couldn't find any moral imperative as I find in the Bible."

Von Campe is the author of How Was It Possible?: The Story of a Hitler Youth and a Vital Analysis for Today's Times (Top Executive Media, October 2006). His website describes the book as "the autobiography of Hitler youth and German soldier Hilmar von Campe ... an active participant in the greatest tragedy of the twentieth century" and notes that in his book, "von Campe warns the world that it faces the same challenges today with radical Islam as it did in the 1930's."

During the broadcast on KNUS 710 AM, von Campe also stated that "God is being taken out of ... public places," amounting to "a repetition of what I went through as a child."

For his part, Andrews claimed that von Campe's description of Nazi rule "sound[s] chillingly familiar to today's America where the secularists are on the move."

From the January 14 broadcast of KNUS 710 AM's Backbone Radio:

VON CAMPE: What Islam stands for -- and I have read the Quran, and I couldn't find any moral imperative as I find in the Bible. There was nowhere that said you have to love your neighbor, and to love your neighbor as you love -- first, you love God and then you love your neighbor. That is essential of any -- to religion, however you explain it. So then I would apply -- and I would, I would also apply that most people, including in the Western world, make the mistake of identifying religion with God. God is not religion. There was no religion when the world was, when humanity was created. God has his commandments which are true for everybody: pagan, Hindu, Buddhist, Christian.

[...]

ANDREWS: Hilmar, I liked your chapter about the neo-Nazis near the end of your book How Was It Possible? And you make the point that we trivialize the continuing poison, or bacillus, of Nazism if we simply identify it with youthful hoodlums or fringe groups. Who are the neo-Nazis around us today, in your analysis?

VON CAMPE: Well, I'll give you one example: I think the ACLU is distributing Nazi philosophy. I remember the Gestapo state police agents in front of our church taking down our names, and my father and my mother and four of us children and everybody knew that it was intimidation. They didn't like us to go to church, but this is where my father didn't budge is that we went to church. Now, they told us in the Hitler Youth and in the school -- they said literally, "You can sing and pray at home or in your churches as much as you like, but in the society we rule." The Nazi -- the National Socialists sets the rules and so --

ANDREWS: So they wanted to privatize religion and they were going to give you a little sphere of living -- or at least professing, if not living -- your faith behind closed doors at home, but that was the only place. It does sound chillingly familiar to today's America where the secularists are on the move.

VON CAMPE: Well, God is being taken out of the -- out of education, out of the government, out of any public places, and the Congress doesn't do a thing. I cannot understand it. This is a repetition of what I went through as a child. And I don't want the same to happen to my children, and my grandchildren.

We've changed our commenting system to Disqus.
Instructions for signing up and claiming your comment history are located here.
Updated rules for commenting are here.