Carlson wonders why no one mentions that Dems "win" those making more than $100k -- because they don't

››› ››› MATTHEW BIEDLINGMAIER

On the October 16 edition of MSNBC's Tucker, discussing third-quarter fundraising totals for the 2008 presidential candidates with The Hill associate editor A.B Stoddard and Politico staff writer Josephine Hearn, host Tucker Carlson asserted: "[H]ere's the fact that nobody ever, ever mentions -- Democrats win rich people." He continued: "Over 100,000 in income, you are likely more than not to vote for Democrats. People never point that out. Rich people vote liberal. I don't know what that's all about." However, according to CNN exit polls from the 2006 congressional elections, the 2004 presidential election, the 2004 congressional elections, and the 2000 presidential election, voters with annual incomes of more than $100,000 are more likely to vote for Republican, not Democratic, candidates.

  • According to CNN exit polls from the 2006 congressional elections, 47 percent of voters with incomes of $100,000 or more supported a Democratic candidate for the House, while 52 percent of such voters supported a Republican candidate for the House. Additionally, 45 percent of voters with incomes of $200,000 or more supported a Democratic candidate, while 53 percent of such voters supported a Republican candidate.
  • According to CNN exit polls from the 2004 presidential election, 41 percent of voters with incomes of $100,000 or more voted for Democratic candidate John Kerry, while 58 percent of such voters cast their ballots for Republican candidate George W. Bush. Additionally, 35 percent of voters with incomes of $200,000 or more voted for Kerry, while 63 percent of such voters supported Bush.
  • According to CNN exit polls from the 2004 congressional elections, 42 percent of voters with incomes of $100,000 or more supported a Democratic candidate for the House of Representatives, while 57 percent of such voters supported a Republican candidate for the House. Additionally, 36 percent of voters with incomes of $200,000 or more supported a Democratic candidate while 62 percent of such voters supported a Republican candidate.
  • According to CNN exit polls from the 2000 presidential election, 43 percent of voters with incomes of $100,000 or more voted for Democratic candidate Al Gore, while 54 percent of such voters supported Bush.

According to CNN's website, "Due to problems at Voter News Service, exit polls were not available for the 2002 [congressional] election."

From the October 16 edition of MSNBC's Tucker:

CARLSON: Third-quarter fundraising totals are in. The Democrats are crushing Republicans. They really are -- outraising the GOP by 3-to-1. Take a close look at the numbers, and you will see why. Wall Street and big business are giving to Democrats, big time. Are they betting on the winner? Of course they are. It's not out of love. An obvious rhetorical question, but in any case, we welcome back to answer it associate editor of The Hill A.B. Stoddard and the Politico's Josephine Hearn.

OK. Because actually, the numbers are unbelievable. And I could bore viewers all day with breakdowns. But here's just one: Goldman Sachs, 71 percent of money from Goldman to Democrats. J.P. Morgan, 68 percent to Democrats. I mean, the obvious explanation is they didn't get to be big business by being stupid. And they perceive Democrats are going to win. Is there another explanation, or is that it?

STODDARD: It's -- I think it's two reasons. I think there's the perception that the Democrats will hold power for the time being, and, on the other hand, also, they're punishing Republicans because they think that if you look back at the last 12 years and the last seven, that they weren't minding the store.

CARLSON: Yeah. So, you think they're legitimate complaints. It's not just hedging against the future.

STODDARD: No, there are. There are economic conservatives who will never vote for a Democrat because they associate the party still with big, unwieldy social programs and -- but you look at lot of moder-- sort of centrist Republicans, right-leaning independents, they're going to break away. They're going to lean the other way.

CARLSON: OK, but here's the fact that nobody ever, ever mentions -- Democrats win rich people. Over 100,000 in income, you are likely more than not to vote for Democrats. People never point that out. Rich people vote liberal. I don't know what that's all about. Drug companies -- this is the most amazing fact of all -- Democrats spend their entire waking hours, Josie, is this correct, beating up the big drug companies.

HEARN: Right, right.

CARLSON: Fifty percent of money from the big drug companies going to Democrats. Is this masochism?

HEARN: Well, I mean, I think overall, business was really upset with the Republicans over the past 12 years. I mean, like, if you're a businessperson, especially a successful one, and you're looking at the sort of, you know, poor management we saw with Katrina, we saw with Iraq, the lack of fiscal responsibility, the lack of accountability, I mean, I think you're pretty disappointed with the Republicans.

Posted In
Elections
Network/Outlet
MSNBC
Person
Tucker Carlson
Show/Publication
Tucker
Stories/Interests
2008 Elections
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