Fox News graphic: "Rudov: Clinton's 'nagging voice' is reason she lost male vote"

››› ››› JEREMY HOLDEN

On Your World, Marc Rudov, author of Under the Clitoral Hood: How to Crank Her Engine Without Cash, Booze, or Jumper Cables, asserted: "When Barack Obama speaks, men hear, 'Take off for the future.' And when Hillary Clinton speaks, men hear, 'Take out the garbage.' " During his appearance on the show, on-screen text read: "Rudov: Clinton's 'nagging voice' is reason she lost male vote."

During the January 4 edition of Fox News' Your World, host Neil Cavuto introduced a segment with Marc Rudov, author of Under the Clitoral Hood: How to Crank Her Engine Without Cash, Booze, or Jumper Cables, and Fox News legal analyst and University of Washington associate professor of law Lis Wiehl about the January 3 Democratic caucuses in Iowa: "[M]en overwhelmingly picking Barack Obama over Hillary Clinton in Iowa. Why? Well, Marc Rudov says it's because of her nagging voice." The program then aired clips from several Clinton campaign appearances and displayed on-screen text reading: "Rudov: Clinton's 'nagging voice' is reason she lost male vote." At Cavuto's request, Rudov then explained his argument, asserting: "When Barack Obama speaks, men hear, 'Take off for the future.' And when Hillary Clinton speaks, men hear, 'Take out the garbage.' "

After Wiehl challenged Rudov's characterization of male voters in Iowa, Rudov offered the following support for his argument: "I get into lots of taxicabs and I tell the drivers this whole thing about Hillary being shrill, and they say, 'That's right. That's right. You're exactly right.' " Later in the exchange, Rudov asserted that Clinton "does register with married men, like a small worm boring through the brain."

From the January 4 edition of Fox News' Your World with Neil Cavuto:

CAVUTO: All right, well men -- men overwhelmingly picking Barack Obama over Hillary Clinton in Iowa. Why? Well, Marc Rudov says it's because of her nagging voice. Listen.

[begin video clip]

CLINTON: So go to the caucus tomorrow. Stand up for me for one night.

CLINTON: Get elected in the first place. To go in to the White House.

CLINTON: To get our country back. To do what Americans do together, and to feel pride and confidence in the goodness and greatness of America again.

CLINTON: Safeguard our civil liberties, our rights and our privacy.

[end video clip]

CAVUTO: All right, well, Marc has been saying it for months, men won't vote for Hillary Clinton because she reminds them of their nagging wives. Lis Wiehl, of course, agrees. No, she doesn't. I'm just seeing if Lis is watching.

WIEHL: No.

CAVUTO: All right, so, Marc, explain.

RUDOV: Well, you know on November 9th, I predicted this, and this is exactly what happened. It's very interesting. When Barack Obama speaks, men hear, "Take off for the future." And when Hillary Clinton speaks, men hear, "Take out the garbage."

CAVUTO: Well, all right.

RUDOV: When Hillary, Hillary tried in the last week of the campaign to be gentle and kind and civil, but it was too little, too late. And men -- you know, the first time men hear nagging, they get post-traumatic stress disorder, and they never recover from it.

CAVUTO [laughing]: All right, I don't find that that silly, I'm just wondering how it sounds.

[...]

RUDOV: Hillary tried in the last week of the campaign to be gentle and kind and civil, but it was too little and too late. And men -- you know, when -- the first time men hear nagging, they get posttraumatic stress disorder, and never recover from it.

CAVUTO: All right, I don't find that that silly. I'm just wondering how that sounds. Lis, you, of course, agree?

WIEHL [in high voice]: Marc, I don't know what you're talking about. She just sounds hoarse, not shrill. What are you talking about? Take out the garbage.

[crosstalk]

CAVUTO: Well, what do you -- something happened?

WIEHL: I agree. She sounds hoarse. Look, look --

RUDOV: Lis, I can't tell the difference between this week and last week.

WIEHL: With me?

RUDOV: With you.

WIEHL: No, no. Listen, Marc, though, seriously.

RUDOV: Yes, seriously.

WIEHL: Your argument totally fails, because you know what? The percentage point between single men, you know, single men that voted for Obama and Hillary was a difference of 12 percent. Between married men that voted between Obama and Clinton, it was 2 percent. So more married men --

CAVUTO: Well, single men also have girlfriends, right? It could remind them of their girlfriend.

WIEHL: Well, I think that Marc would argue that once the wife becomes a wife, that's when she becomes shrill. Right, Marc?

RUDOV: Absolutely. As a matter of fact, Lis, when you talk to me, I think you say my name 25 times in 15 seconds. And that's what it reminds me of.

WIEHL: That's an endearing thing.

RUDOV: Oh, yes, especially when you're tilting your head, rolling your eyes back. Now, the thing is is that --

WIEHL: Marc, the stats don't -- you can make fun of me all you want, but the stats don't lie. Twelve percent for single men difference --

RUDOV: Yeah, Lis, I get into lots of taxicabs and I tell the drivers this whole thing about Hillary being shrill, and they say, "That's right. That's right. You're exactly right."

WIEHL: And, Marc, why is it that when a man says something like, "Go for the future," it's all of this, you know, it's -- he's visionary, and when a woman says the same thing, albeit in a hoarse voice, she's shrill, and she's a, you know, word that I can't use on this family show here?

RUDOV: If you're familiar with Meg Whitman, who's the CEO of eBay -- when she speaks, she's an amazing speaker, she's great to listen to. I'll listen to her any day of the week. But here's the thing: Style is the substance -- sorry. Style is the gateway --

WIEHL: Yeah, get it right, Marc. Get your style right.

RUDOV: Style is the gateway to substance. If you don't have good style, if you don't connect with the audience, they're going to tune you out. They're never gonna hear you.

WIEHL: But Marc --

CAVUTO: He's right there. That's the story of my life. But go ahead.

RUDOV: And that is why Neil Cavuto is so successful.

WIEHL: Oh, are you kissing up now?

CAVUTO: Exactly. That's exactly right.

WIEHL: But the point is, has nothing to do with her voice. You may not like her message, you may not like what she's saying. But you may not like that she wasn't -- that she didn't appear to be for change, that she came out with the husband, who's bringing her down.

[crosstalk]

CAVUTO: OK, so take the voice out of it, then. Why doesn't she register with men?

RUDOV: Lis, you just ignored what I said. Her style was terrible.

WIEHL: She does register, I think, with married men. There is a 2 percent difference here, and this is in Iowa, which is a fairly, you know, conservative place. There may already be some prejudices against women to begin with. So just a 2 percent difference, as opposed to a 12 percent difference for single men, I think speaks volumes.

RUDOV: She does register with married men, like a small worm boring through the brain. It's not going to happen, and there are 49 more states to go, and it's not going to happen.

WIEHL: All right, Marc. Let's just keep on checking in on this, all right? Because I'm betting you.

RUDOV: And I'm still waiting for that tie from you, Lis.

WIEHL [in high voice]: I'm still betting you.

CAVUTO: Man. All right. Look, this is just an unscientific survey.

RUDOV: I rest my case, Neil. I rest my case.

CAVUTO: All right. That's fine. I have a feeling I'll be sleeping outside the house tonight.

Posted In
Diversity & Discrimination, Gender
Stories/Interests
Hillary Clinton, 2008 Elections
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