Brzezinski cherry-picked polling to assert "McCain's crossover appeal is apparently even greater than" Obama's

››› ››› JEREMY HOLDEN

Citing a Pew Research poll, MSNBC's Mika Brzezinski asserted that "John McCain's crossover appeal is apparently even greater than Barack Obama's." However, polling has differed on the question of whether McCain or Obama would have greater "crossover appeal" -- appeal to members of the opposite party -- and two polls more recent than the Pew poll Brzezinski cited found that Obama received greater "crossover" support.

During the March 7 edition of MSNBC Live, anchor Mika Brzezinski asserted, "[Sen.] John McCain's crossover appeal is apparently even greater than [Sen.] Barack Obama's. A Pew Research poll shows that about 14 percent of Democrats say they would vote for McCain over Obama. But just 8 percent of Republicans say they would vote for Obama." In fact, polling has differed on the question of whether McCain or Obama would have greater "crossover appeal," and two polls more recent than the February 20-24 Pew poll Brzezinski cited found that Obama received greater "crossover" support: An ABC News/Washington Post poll found that 16 percent of Republicans would vote for Obama, and 14 percent of Democrats would vote for McCain in a hypothetical matchup; a Cook-RT Strategies poll found that 13 percent of Republicans would vote for Obama, compared with 10 percent of Democrats who would vote for McCain. Additionally, the Pew Research poll Brzezinski cited also found that overall, 50 percent of registered voters said they would vote for Obama, compared with 43 percent who said they would vote for McCain.

Other recent polls have found different results from the Pew poll on the "crossover" question, and four of those five polls showed Obama winning against McCain overall:

  • An ABC News/Washington Post poll conducted February 28-March 2 found that 14 percent of Democrats would vote for McCain and 16 percent of Republicans would vote for Obama. Obama beat McCain 53-40 among registered voters.
  • The Cook-RT Strategies poll -- also conducted February 28-March 2 -- found that 13 percent of Republicans would vote for Obama and 10 percent of Democrats who would vote for McCain. Obama beat McCain 47-38 among registered voters.
  • A Bloomberg/Los Angeles Times poll conducted February 21-25 found that 14 percent of Democrats would vote for McCain in a hypothetical matchup against Obama, while 12 percent of Republicans would vote for Obama. McCain beat Obama 44-42 percent among registered voters.
  • A CBS News/New York Times poll conducted February 20-24 found that 14 percent of Republicans would support Obama, compared with 11 percent of Democrats who would support McCain. Obama beat McCain 50-38 among registered voters.
  • A Fox News/Opinion Dynamics poll conducted February 19-20 found that 19 percent of Democrats would vote for McCain in a hypothetical matchup against Obama, while 12 percent of Republicans would vote for Obama. Obama beat McCain 47-43 among registered voters.

From the 9 a.m. ET hour of the March 7 edition of MSNBC News Live:

BRZEZINSKI: Well, MSNBC keeps you up to the minute with your top political headlines. Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama head to Wyoming today ahead of tomorrow's caucuses there. There are 12 delegates up for grabs there. There's still no winner to report in the Texas caucuses. Right now Obama is leading Clinton 56 to 44 percent, but fewer than half of the precincts have reported their results. And John McCain's crossover appeal is apparently even greater than Barack Obama's. A Pew Research poll shows that about 14 percent of Democrats say they would vote for McCain over Obama. But just 8 percent of Republicans say they would vote for Obama. Hmm.

So the question now: Is Pennsylvania the new Iowa?

Network/Outlet
MSNBC
Person
Mika Brzezinski
Show/Publication
MSNBC Live
Stories/Interests
Barack Obama, 2008 Elections
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