AP noted McCain's sponsorship of comprehensive immigration bill, but not that he wouldn't vote for it now

››› ››› ERIC HANANOKI

The AP reported that "Sens. Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton supported a 2006 bill, sponsored by Republican candidate John McCain, that offered illegal immigrants legal status on conditions such as learning English." But the AP did not note that McCain has reversed his position on comprehensive immigration legislation and said in January that he would no longer support his own bill.

In an April 29 article, the Associated Press reported: "Sens. Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton supported a 2006 bill, sponsored by Republican candidate John McCain, that offered illegal immigrants legal status on conditions such as learning English." AP writer Sophia Tareen did not note, however, that McCain said on January 30 that he would no longer vote for his own bill, having abandoned his support for comprehensive immigration legislation during his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination. McCain now says that "we've got to secure the borders first" -- a position at odds with his prior assertion that border security could not be disaggregated from other aspects of comprehensive immigration reform without being rendered ineffective.

McCain has also reversed his position on the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act, which would have allowed "illegal immigrants under age 30 to remain in the United States and gain legal status if they attend college or join the military." Clinton and Obama both voted in favor of the DREAM Act, and both support the DREAM Act's enactment.

From the April 29 AP article:

Immigration activists and civil rights leaders are gearing up for rallies and marches in cities across the nation, hoping to revive the stagnant immigration debate in time for the presidential election.

Activists predict turnout for the more than 200 events planned Thursday from Seattle to Miami will be far less than in years past. But they say efforts demanding comprehensive immigration legislation -- including pathways to citizenship for the estimated 12 million illegal immigrants living in the U.S. -- have extended beyond the streets.

[...]

Immigration reform hasn't resonated with voters in primary elections who overwhelmingly list the economy as their top concern. Immigration legislation has stalled and been defeated in the Senate. Presidential candidates have not extensively addressed the contentious issue.

"Folks are staying away from the immigration debate, it's a touchy subject," said Luis Gutierrez, executive director of Chicago-based Latinos Progresando. "Some don't want to talk about it, unless it's 'build a fence."

Democratic presidential rivals Sens. Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton supported a 2006 bill, sponsored by Republican candidate John McCain, that offered illegal immigrants legal status on conditions such as learning English. All three also have supported a border fence.

Community leaders say fear of raids and mistrust of authorities also might lead to lower turnouts Thursday.

Posted In
Elections, Immigration
Network/Outlet
Associated Press
Stories/Interests
John McCain, 2008 Elections
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